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Notary Bulletin

4 Steps to become a mobile Notary

For people looking to start their own businesses — or make money on the side — becoming a mobile Notary has long been a viable option. It is simple to do in 4 easy steps, the start-up financial cost is fairly low and you can work at it either part-time or full-time.

Mobile Notaries travel to signers’ locations to notarize documents. They earn money by charging a fee for the notarization up to the limit allowed by their state’s law. Some states also permit Notaries to charge a travel fee.

The 4 steps for becoming a mobile Notary are as follows:

  • Step 1: Become a Notary (if you aren’t one already)
  • Step 2: Create a business plan
  • Step 3: Create an internet presence
  • Step 4: Market yourself

The difference between a mobile Notary and a Notary Signing Agent

Being a mobile Notary is different from working as a Notary Signing Agent (NSA). An NSA possesses extra certifications in order to take mortgage-signing assignments from title companies. Someone who works just as a mobile Notary does not possess these additional qualifications and does not get mortgage-signing assignments. But they can take any other notarization request.

Step 1: Become a Notary

The requirements for becoming a Notary vary from state to state. At a minimum, you will be required to fill out an application and pay a filing fee. Depending on your state, you also may be required to:

  • Complete a training course
  • Pass an exam
  • Undergo a background check
  • Purchase a surety bond
  • Purchase supplies such as a Notary seal and journal

While no state requires you to have Notary errors & omissions insurance, it is advisable for any self-employed Notary to have an E&O policy.

Step 2: Create a business plan 

A business plan helps you map out where you want to accomplish and how you expect to accomplish it. It does not have to be complicated, but it helps get and keep you on track. Among other things, it should include:

  • What services you offer
  • How far you’re willing to travel (or the geographic area you plan to serve)
  • Where you expect to find business (such as healthcare facilities, schools, small law firms, banks and military installations)
  • How you plan to market your services

Step 3: Create an internet presence

No business, no matter how small, can expect to thrive without an internet presence. Most potential customers will search the internet to find a mobile Notary. At a minimum, you should have a website that includes:

  • Your business name and contact information
  • The services you offer (including services other than notarizations)
  • The geographic area you serve
  • Any other pertinent informatio

It’s also a good idea to create profiles on various Notary forums and set up social media pages for your business. You want to make it as easy as possible for potential customers to find you.

Step 4: Market yourself

This is the key to your success. The more effort you invest in marketing your services, the more business you’ll get.

Again, your internet presence is important. Regular social media posts about your business will help get you noticed. That can include short videos on YouTube and shared links on Facebook.

Apart from the internet, person-to-person networking is invaluable. Your community will have a variety of businesses and organizations that often need a Notary, and your business plan will identify many of these entities. Circumstances permitting, make the rounds of these organizations to drop off your business card, then periodically revisit so potential customers get to know you.

Final thoughts

Once you get your mobile Notary business up and running, consider ways to expand your offerings. You could add non-Notary services, such as I-9 services and apostille services. You also can consider becoming an NSA to take loan-signing signing assignments.

 

 

 

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