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What Would You Do: The Case Of The Cat-Head Signature

Cat-Head-Signature-450x300-1.jpgThe Notary Hotline receives hundreds of calls daily from Notaries nationwide who find themselves in challenging situations. To boost your knowledge of Notary standards of practice, we’ve created a series of scenarios based on actual situations based on actual situations and ask a simple question: What would you do?

Imagine you’re a Notary Signing Agent who’s just arrived for an appointment to complete a loan document signing. You sit down with the borrower and he presents you with his driver’s license as proof of identity. However, while inspecting the driver’s license, you notice that in place of a handwritten signature on the ID, there is a picture of 3 cat heads. The signer laughs. “I signed using cat heads instead of a normal signature when I renewed my license,” he says. “I meant it as a joke, but they let it through.”

What Would You Do?

Now you have someone ready to sign critical loan documents … but his signature on his ID is a series of pictures instead of a regular handwritten signature. Do you feel comfortable accepting this ID? Is it OK for the borrower to sign the loan documents with a regular handwritten signature when his ID shows a different type of signature? Or does the borrower’s signature on the loan document have to match the signature appearing on his license? What would you do in this situation?

To participate in this week’s “What Would You Do?” scenario, share your answers in the comments section below. We may mention your response in next week’s Bulletin, when we offer the best possible answer(s) to this notarial challenge.

David Thun is an Associate Editor at the National Notary Association.

Additional Resources:

Handling Name Discrepancies

 

203 Comments

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Julie Beckner Reinwald

20 Oct 2019

I would ask for another form or gov’t issued photo ID. He he couldn’t produce one them I’d call the NNA Hotline to get advice.

Merianne White

21 Oct 2019

Yes, I would accept the cat pictographs as they match the ID and would I ensure he signed my journal the same in the event of a challenge. I view it no differently than Mandarin or Kanji.

Keziah

21 Oct 2019

Granted this is unique but I can't see any state recognizing such on a drivers license. I would ask for another picture ID or explain doesn't meet criteria.

Teresa Ross

21 Oct 2019

Ask the signer to print then sign his name on another piece of paper to verify signature. This piece of paper should be kept with the Notary Journal for future reference.

Arlene Rheinfelder

21 Oct 2019

While unusual, the cat head signature is still a mark made by the signer. My job is to verify identity and that the signer actually made the mark. The legal definition of signature is "A mark or sign made by an individual on an instrument or document to signify knowledge, approval, acceptance, or obligation." The cat heads qualify as a mark.

Kyle

21 Oct 2019

Different animal, but almost identical situation. Called the title company who was familiar with the signer who advised "we are comfortable with the (animal)".

Ellie Payton

21 Oct 2019

Really not sure what to do.

Patricia Bernier

21 Oct 2019

For me I would not accept the ID. I believe it is the same as looking at a stamped signature and it is truly not a "wet" signature. I would ask for something with his signed name and not a series of stamps. I would explain to him that I wouldn't be able to accept a stamp on the documents and that it needs to come directly from his hand because of the need to avoid fraud.

Afzal M. Dudhia

21 Oct 2019

I would not accept the driver license as an acceptable form of ID but would ask for another ID such as a passport. I would suggest that he go get another driver license issues with the proper signature.

vera howard

21 Oct 2019

Ask for a second ID, have him sign both, his name and his cat pictures

Audrey Goodwin

21 Oct 2019

the person should sign the document as his name is written on the document. The ID is showing picture proof of their identity. You should only worry if the pic on the ID is a cat LOL

Kathy Barnes

21 Oct 2019

Ugh! What DO you do in this situation? I think I would ask for another form of ID with a signature on it.

Cheri D. Hodges

21 Oct 2019

I would request another form of I.D.

Yolanda Adams

21 Oct 2019

If description and name on ID match signer, I accept. Signatures don't always match -- hand injury, illness (i.e. arthritis), amputation and now has to use less-dominant hand, etc. Most people's signature changes/evolves from early years (teenage) to middle age years. Depending on how long they've had the same license, signature may change. Some states issue license for extended period of time. For example: Arizona issues an "extended" driver license that does not expire until age 65. Still, the photo on the license and the vision exam must be updated every 12 years. Drivers 60 years old and older receive a five-year license.

Cindy Straub

21 Oct 2019

WOW! I am amazed they allowed that when he got is Driver's License. I would question how he had signed all the loan documents (application, etc.) up to that point and confirm that is acceptable to the lender before proceeding.

David Ivory

21 Oct 2019

I would have the client sign as on the ID, and have at least 2 witnesses at the signing. And also have the client sign on an extra line.

Carol in Tennessee

21 Oct 2019

in my opinion this would be considered a frivolous signature and would not be acceptable with me nor do I think in the state of Tennessee it seems as though someone in the identification department thought it was a joke and didn't realize the problems that will come down the road I would immediately stop this by having him one write a letter of explanation on how this happened and that it was his intention to sign his signature as a normal script signature.

John Axt

21 Oct 2019

Ask for another acceptable form of ID.

Ty Rogowsky

21 Oct 2019

Their signature does not necessarily have to be their name, it can be just a mark. As long as the mark they make in your journal matches the one on their photo id, you're good. Photo and description should match ad well, of course!

Brenda R King-Holley

21 Oct 2019

I would require another piece of identification that had the person's actual signature. The cat heads might have passed through the drivers' license bureau but most likely would be successfully challenged in court.

Robin John Rutt

21 Oct 2019

Also in some cultures someone will print their name and then print their name as the signature

Robin John Rutt

21 Oct 2019

Call CA Sec of State and send circumstances to cA sos hotline Inform the lender/real estate agent/broker who sent you on the assignment Usually if you’re a notary signing agent for loan documents there’s a place somewhere along the way where the lender is asking for a picture of the drivers license and you also put on a document what you used to identify that person with and also when you make the entry into your journal you will have the thumbprint and the printed way they have their name on their identification Depending on what the Secretary of State says, ask for another form of identification with the proper signature. Most people these days Have a secondary identification card state issued picture ID, passport, etc

Sue Spitzner

21 Oct 2019

Ask for another form of ID even though i love and respect cats! :-)

Deborah J Garhartt

21 Oct 2019

No they cannot sign with 3 cat heads now that you know it is not their normal proper signature.

Greg Morrisey

21 Oct 2019

I wouldn’t touch this one with a10 foot pole!

CONNIE HOLMES

21 Oct 2019

I would ask for another government issued ID such as a passport, showing the correct signature, and then suggest that he go back and get his driver liicense corrected since he will probably need it for other legal uses in the future.

Delores Owens

21 Oct 2019

I don't think I would feel comfortable notarizing the document.

Carol Goode

21 Oct 2019

I wouldn’t notarize it

Jodi Michelle Jones

21 Oct 2019

What the heck? Why is this even a question? The English language is letters, not pictures. If a person can not cognitive to sign some form of alphabet, how am I to know that they are cognitively aware of what they are signing? I say no, and that there should me some form of mental maturity. Cats...really?

Debra Troxell

21 Oct 2019

I would not notarize the documents.

Angel

21 Oct 2019

Request a secondary piece of Identification

Evelyn hatt

21 Oct 2019

I think he should sign his name on the loan documents and request for additional photo I’d such as his social security card for his signature to match

Nicole Duff

21 Oct 2019

I would not feel comfortable, however I would ask to see his ss card and or passport or any other government documents or old drivers license.

Jerry Owen

21 Oct 2019

If they also signed the signature affidavit that way and if their driver’s license had that signature on it, I would accept it.

Randall Kirby

21 Oct 2019

First of all it's important to check to see if there is a Name/Signature Affidavit in the documents. This often will satisfy the lender/escrow, etc. However, even knowing this, my first response to call before we start signing to get a qualified go-ahead from the lender, escrow or signing company.

Chad Abrams

21 Oct 2019

If he signs it with a signature in the journal as well as the documents match then it shouldn’t matter at that point because I’m notarizing his ID with the picture and the name since the state issued it out to this person and then I verified in my journal and have the thumbprint to go along with it to cooperate that I did everything I’m supposed to do. Looking up in the notary journal document there’s nothing stating that it Hass to match the state ID just that you check the ID to make sure that that is a

Millie

21 Oct 2019

I would first ask the lender (which would most likely be a bank) if they have a signature on file for the signer. Then I would have the signer sign with the three cat faces, then his regular signature before I would notarize it.

Maggie

21 Oct 2019

If I was presented with cat heads or something similar, I would "use what was on the ID card" and would match to what signature was presented. They would need to match in order to notarize.

Phil Schobert

21 Oct 2019

Use an AKA statement and have the borrower sign their name as well as the cat pictures on the drivers license and make the borrower present another form of ID with their real name and a sample signature.

DeAnn Hailey

21 Oct 2019

The signatures must match so the signer would need to draw the same cat heads as it appears on their driver's license or provide other identification so that the signatures match.

Ruby Ann Love

21 Oct 2019

I would have client sign as their name appears on the loan docs or ID as these are legal documents.

David Sean Rubalcava

21 Oct 2019

I would check to see if there is another form of ID that has his regular signature, or get two credible witnesses.

Steven R Day

21 Oct 2019

If it is his legally recognized signature and the ID description and address match and there is a witness to attest to it I would accept the ID. I would probably read the documents being signed out loud and the have the witness read the.out loud. All of this after checking on the state laws of course.

Orin Lowe

21 Oct 2019

I would ask the signer if he was going to sign the documents using the three cats. If he said no, I would ask if he has another form of ID that caries his actual signature so I could see an example of something signed in his own hand. If he said yes, I would clear this with the title, escrow, or signing service. Very few people have a signature that legibly represents their name today. In addition, many people’s signature changes over time and does not match their ID exactly at the time of signing. My California Driver License has had the same picture and signature for 14 years now my appearance and signature have changed quite a bit since then. If I feel I have positively identified someone, I do not insist that their signature match the signature on their ID exactly. I would complete this signing with an alternate signature if I felt comfortable that I had positively identified the signer. I would complete the signing with the three-cat signature if this was allowed by the title, escrow or, signing service that sent me out. Orin Lowe Notary Public and Signing Agent Since 2006

Patti R

21 Oct 2019

While this was a cute "joke" (the cat faces are cute), it shows how agencies do not pay attention to much of anything when applying for an important identification document. A Notary should ask to see other acceptable documents with the real signature and/or a photo (i.e. social security card, passport, etc.).

Cynde

21 Oct 2019

If I could not reach the National Notary organization, I would have them sign the cat signature followed by AKA their full name. The reason for this is because the state DL is considered an acceptable form of ID and many documents ask for signature the way it appears on the DL.

Paula Stiles

21 Oct 2019

I'm not as concerned about the signature matching as I am about the authenticity of the driver's license. I have trouble believing a) that he would do this as a joke b) that the DMV would let it through. I wouldn't go forward with the notarization if that is the only government issued ID he had.

Lori Carpenter

21 Oct 2019

If he could duplicate the pictures as they appear on the I.D., I believe I would accept them with a witness as in someone signing with an "X".

Elaine Solano

21 Oct 2019

I would ask the individual to provide me with another form of acceptable ID. I would let the individual know which are other forms of acceptable ID.

Shelly Kitchen

21 Oct 2019

Ask for two credible Witnesses and not accept the ID. It is obviously not a signature and got past the DMV it should not get past the notary.

Shawn Dawson

21 Oct 2019

This challenge is a tough one. If the signer signed his documents with his name and it did not match his identification, I would not accept the signature. To be safe, the signer would have to provide other supporting documentation and/or another form of identification with his name as his signature for me to continue allowing him to sign his actual name.

Martin Renteria

21 Oct 2019

The signature with 3 cast heads would give me reason to believe the ID may be fraudulent. I would stop the closing, notify title.

DeAnn Hailey

21 Oct 2019

Second thought, the identification must match the signer not necessarily the signature.

Lisa Blumenkamp

21 Oct 2019

I would ask for a different form of ID, such as a passport, or verify with the DOR that the "cat heads" are truly acceptable.

Pamela A Ringgold

21 Oct 2019

The first thing that I would do is explain to the customer that I realize that you signed this as a joke while at the motor vehicles, however I have to get authorization from my superiors as to how they want you to sign these critical loan documents. I would then proceed by calling the the signing service first and then their loan officer. I always get approval from my superiors rather than just taking things into my own hands.

Debra H Wenzel

21 Oct 2019

I would refuse to notarize his loan document unless he could produce other/additional ID that has his actual "signature" on it. Three cat heads meant at a joke at the DMV does not qualify as his actual signature -- he event admitted as such. Now that he's signing actual loan documents, he needs to prove who he is and what his signature is. If he cannot do that, then I won't notarize the loan documents for him.

James

21 Oct 2019

As long as his signature matches the drivers license (the kitty faces), yes, do it. There is nothing saying that cannot be his signature. The state has already accepted it as his signature.

Rebecca Pace

21 Oct 2019

curious of others' replies

Claudia Rodriguez

21 Oct 2019

I would have him sign has printed on the loan documents since that is what they have to do anyways. (Example Lisc shows John D. Doe but docs show only John Doe. He would sign John Doe.) I have already determined him to be the person said to be.

Mary McDaniel

21 Oct 2019

If the DMV allowed it and all of the information on the signer's driver's license matched, I would allow it.

Larry Greer

21 Oct 2019

I would be WAY uncomfortable with this! I would have to ask for another piece of ID with a real signature! I think that the name in the docs, the signature and the ID all have to match (so if the person's name is John Marie Schlablotnick and that's in the docs, he would have to sign that way and his ID would have to read that way) So unless the docs refer to borrower as a row of Kitties Dude's going to have to come up with an alternative

Myra Muhammad

21 Oct 2019

I would ask for another form of ID, the critical docs require a borrowers signature not pictures of cat heads.

Shelley L. Reeve

21 Oct 2019

He signed his driver's license with three cat heads, created in his own penmanship? 1. I would ask him/het if that was their usual signature; 2) I would ask if that was the signature their bank had on file. Then I would watch them sign and proceed with the notarization, as long as their photo was a good likeness of the person and not that of a cat!!

Patti

21 Oct 2019

If it matches the signature on the ID, then okay. Otherwise, no.

Elizabeth A. Sutton

21 Oct 2019

I would offer a couple thoughts: Call agency who hired you for verification to accept said signature and/or have them sign their name along with aka ”three cat heads” or visa versa

Suzanne Ryan

21 Oct 2019

I would require him to produce a second form of ID that does have his actual signature.

R Gomez

21 Oct 2019

I would have them sign the documents exactly as shown. Because I am witnessing them signing, it can be recorded as such. I am verifying that person is the same on their legal ID, but they are asking them to sign as shown, not necessarily their signature on ID. Many times they add in a middle name and that isn't how they sign either or their legal signature, but lender requests to sign as shown. I notarize that that is the person in front of me signing.

Wheny Wulandari

21 Oct 2019

I will accept "cat" signature as long as it match with the ID she/he show me. That's what I will have it at the notary log book as well.

Karen Flores

21 Oct 2019

I would ask for a second form of Id which shows a signature. He would sign my journal twice with both a signature and the cat head signature.

SUSAN PETRIE

21 Oct 2019

I would contact title and let them know of the anomoly in the signature, since this is his/her usual signature. However, they want the docs signed as it is printed under the line. Borrowers often have to sign with or without their middle initial even if they don't do this as a normal signature. Best to notify Title and get their input before continuing with closing.

Ian

21 Oct 2019

Where in CA does it say you have to compare the signature on the ID to the one in the book? That is not what a notary verifies. Any mark by the signer, who has been identified based on the ID, will do (if just a mark and not a signature, you will need 2 witnesses). However, one caveat: Per Civil Code, Section 1185, some IDs (like out of state or Passport) will require an ID that has a signature on it.

Lauren

21 Oct 2019

I would not accept the DL with cats. I would request another form of ID with an actual signature. I have the right to refuse my service if I am uncomfortable with the form of ID they presented.

Lawanda Buendia

21 Oct 2019

I would politely request another valid form of identification that actually contains his signature. If he doesn't provide and alternative, then I would ask if he has a witness who has a valid driver's license to vouch for him. If neither, then I would have to decline the signing and immediately report it to the closing client.

cefigueroa@QuantaServices.com

21 Oct 2019

I would accept the three cats since a legal government document (Driver's License) identifies him/her as such. However, if their name is within the document and not the three cats, I would ask for another document to verify name/picture.

Jessica Seewald

21 Oct 2019

No cat signatures. I've had lots of Hearted I's and one with a heart at the end, which matched to signature on DL and other ids requested. Once I had a literal clown sign with 2 arrows pointing to a smiley face. All his IDs had the same signature and name.

K Edwards

21 Oct 2019

I would accept the signature as long as they signed the same in my journal. It's no different than someone who can only sign an "X" or signs using characters of a different language.

Timothy Couch

21 Oct 2019

I worked with someone who's signature was a series of overlapping ovals. He signed everything in this manner. And he was always consistent. Always starting in the same place, always the same number of ovals, and always ending in the same spot. Although this was not readable as a name, it was his signature. And provided the client signed in that manner, I feel it would be acceptable, provided the due diligence was made to verify the signer.

Delly

21 Oct 2019

I would make sure that signature matches what’s on the loan documents.

Rebecca Denny

21 Oct 2019

Just because the BMV " let it through" does not mean it is ok. Many people do not sign their name as they should on a drivers license. For me, I would have to have another form of ID. Legal documents deserve respect. This protects all parties involved.

n cox

21 Oct 2019

Since the DMV accepted & issued a valid i.d., the signer would have to sign the docs & my journal the same.

n cox

21 Oct 2019

Since the DMV accepted & issued a valid i.d., the signer would have to sign the docs & my journal the same.

Mattie

21 Oct 2019

I agree with Owen, I would honor if all parties involved is okay with it. I would get a thumbprint for my journal for the signer.

Marguerite

21 Oct 2019

I would have them sign my Journal for reference, so both signatures matches.

Ian

21 Oct 2019

Where in CA does it say you have to compare the signature on the ID to the one in the book? That is not what a notary verifies. Any mark by the signer, who has been identified based on the ID, will do (if just a mark and not a signature, you will need 2 witnesses). However, one caveat: Per Civil Code, Section 1185, some IDs (like out of state or Passport) will require an ID that has a signature on it.

Stacey Green

21 Oct 2019

I am bound to accept the identification as valid regardless of how he chose to sign his name. As long as it is an accepted form of ID from the government I cannot mandate him to sign his name other than how it is listed on his drivers license. Specifically we are NOT to read the documents, so if his mortgage paperwork says something else, we are certifying that the individual is who is claims to be and we verified that legally.

Shayla Antrim

21 Oct 2019

I would accept the ID if his photo appeared to match. We aren't comparing signatures, just need ID to prove the signer's identity. MANY people use scribbles as their signature anyhow, so what's really the difference. When my son got his driver's permit, he only signed his first name on accident and that's been his signature on his diver's license ever since. We kind of laugh about it. I would place a comment in the notes section of my notary journal. I think I would have him sign his name along with the cat pictograph just to cover all the bases. As others have said, we are just verifying the signer matches the paperwork. If you get a thumbprint and write down the ID information and a note regarding the pictograph, legally we covered all of our bases. If that was the only discrepancy on the ID and everything else appeared legitimate, there should be no further questions, though I could see why some notaries may not feel comfortable accepting it. If they were loan documents and you verified with the escrow company that this indeed was the correct person, I would certainly proceed in the signing with confidence.

Mellissa hope sadler

21 Oct 2019

I would ask for another government issued id, then require two credible witnesses.

Jennifer Longsworth

21 Oct 2019

I would ask for another government issue ID. If he could not produce one, I would not notarize the cat signature.

Michelle F

21 Oct 2019

I would ask for another form of ID, such as a passport. Since the person did it as a joke it is obviously not his legal signature even though the state has accepted it. If he wants to sign the loan documents, it would be best for him to provide another form of ID or change his license.

Karolin Savarani

21 Oct 2019

I would call the Title Company or the Escrow Officer and if they accept it, I would do it. I would also make a note in my journal to document my call.

ELAINE HAMILTONSWEET

21 Oct 2019

No I would not accept this type if signature.

Tamara Whitehouse

21 Oct 2019

Yes, I would accept the cat signature on the loan documents. I have a friend who use to sign with a house, dog, or tree. I was with her when a bank called and asked and she verified by saying what was drawn. This was her signature.

AP O'Neal

21 Oct 2019

I believe we are to verify him or her, to see if the picture is of the person. The signature on the documents is what we notarize. We watch them sign, then notarize. The loan company should have verified him or her long before the notary arrived; when preparing the documents.

Linda Millstone

21 Oct 2019

If the picture and everything else on the ID appears legitimate I would accept the ID. I would have them affix their signature as per their ID. I would also ask them to sign below the same as they did on the loan application. I would do the same in my journal and write an explanation as to the circumstance and get a thumb print as I am in CA and this is a real property transaction.

Karla Gomez

21 Oct 2019

Taking into consideration that it's a government issued identification and in essence the mark was witnessed by a government official thus making it legal, I would accept it on grounds that I'm unfamiliar with the signers background (illiteracy, disability, etc.). However, I would confirm first with the signer if it is possible for them to provide an additional signature and to print their full name. If this is not possible, my next step would be to ask the signer to produce two witnesses that can confirm their identity and witness the mark, and have them fill out an "acknowledgment of the mark" form in addition to the notarization.

Carolyn V Brown

21 Oct 2019

If the signature does not match any of the legal documents then a "drawing" should not be allowed to be used. In the event anything like this occurs then the signer needs to sign with an "x" and have a witness to co-sign.

Ella@pinkrockllc.com

21 Oct 2019

I would ask for a regular signature follows by the car mark . Maybe the person can’t write so they used the car mark instead of a X .

Von Motschenbacher

21 Oct 2019

In California, signature by mark with two witnesses; cumbersome task for each document in the package

Mike in PA

21 Oct 2019

If that is what is on the legal ID and it matches the document, it is a legal notarization. I actually know an individual that uses a string of complex symbols as his legal signature and it is valid. Confirming the identity of the individual in person is the critical step. A clients signature is evaluated for style or even legibility, as long as it is properly documented on a legal form of ID. In PA the law only requires that the notaries signature be legible and readable as the full name on the notarial seal. There is no such requirement for a client signature.

La Shaundrea Harris

21 Oct 2019

Since the ID is for verification purposes, as long as I can ID him, I would just ask him to sign his name as he normally would on documents when he is not "joking."

Karen DeLise

21 Oct 2019

I would accept the drivers license because the DMV accepted it and I've seen just a line or 1 squiggle for a signature, why not 3 cats. As I think it's rather silly the DMV accepted it, who am I to disagree with the fact that they did. I accept what's on the ID. Sure would be hard to do initials with a cat drawing! :)

Michael McFarland

21 Oct 2019

I agree with the previous comments regarding the signer’s mark. As long as it matches what’s on their Government issued identification, I see no reason to treat it any differently than a ‘normal’ signature. I would, of course, make sure they sign my journal the same way.

Eileen Roe

21 Oct 2019

Many signatures are illegible scrawls; we notaries cannot discern alphabetic characters anywhere in them, but we accept them. At least the cat heads are legible! The signer might have a full beard now, or be wearing a burqa or colander on their head in the photo. Anybody with an unconventional drivers license should bring a second form of ID when requesting notarization, especially if the anomaly is due to a "joke." They should expect to be challenged by any conscientious notary. But we would still have to proceed with the notarization. We don't second-guess the DMV on what names they "let through." Imagine questioning what appears to be a female using and ID with what sounds like a male name and has "X" for their gender. We are ministerial and we go by the book; that's what you get from a notary with today's regulations.

Chris Tipps

21 Oct 2019

I would verify his identity to my satisfaction, and accept his mark. I have encountered a CEO that would use a star on all documents. This is no different. I've met several people that never signed the same way twice. You are to verify the individual signing and that you observed them doing it. No need to be a handwriting expert.

sue laurence

21 Oct 2019

Yes, if the signatures match. The federal govt has issued a decision that regardless of how a person signs, it will be acceptable if it matches their ID.

Len Taylor

21 Oct 2019

I would: 1. Check his driver license with an ultra-violet light to determine whether it is a real ID. 2. In CA, the signature is part of the identification process. Since he admitted that the cat-signature is not his signature, I would require an CA-acceptable ID with his signature on it. Additionally, many lenders require a signer to sign exactly the way his/her name - and do not want a signer to “under-sign.” If he/she did not a another form of valid ID, I would contact the escrow officer and/or loan officer to inform them of the situation before leaving the appointment.

Sudesh Mehru

21 Oct 2019

It should be accepted if other details on the ID are as required.Signature can change over a period for various reasons.ID for identification of person and not his signature.

Jacquelyn

21 Oct 2019

I would not notarize. That was a silly thing for the client to do and I'm not risking my notary license and reputation because of it. Lots of time, effort and money went into getting and maintaining my license. He will have to go elsewhere.

Len Taylor

21 Oct 2019

I would: 1. Check his driver license with an ultra-violet light to determine whether it is a real ID. 2. In CA, the signature is part of the identification process. Since he admitted that the cat-signature is not his signature, I would require an CA-acceptable ID with his signature on it. Additionally, many lenders require a signer to sign exactly the way his/her name - and do not want a signer to “under-sign.” If he/she did not a another form of valid ID, I would contact the escrow officer and/or loan officer to inform them of the situation before leaving the appointment.

Jacquelyn

21 Oct 2019

I would not notarize. That was a silly thing for the client to do and I'm not risking my notary license and reputation because of it. Lots of time, effort and money went into getting and maintaining my license. He will have to go elsewhere.

Katie

21 Oct 2019

I would accept his cat signature on his government issued ID as long as all the other identifying marks checked out. He would be required to sign his cat signature on all documents. I would also record in my journal his comment about his signature and make sure he signs his cat signature. In Texas, we cannot ask for a second ID.

Julie Ann Hoskins

21 Oct 2019

I am shocked that he got by the DMV without them asking if that was his signature. The fact that he said it was a joke tells me he needs to go back to the DMV and tell them that is not his signature. I would ask him for another form of ID with his signature. If he does not have one then I would call Title and ask for advise before proceeding with the signing.

Hanif Thakor

21 Oct 2019

If this is consider Signature by Mark then person will need two witnesses. Otherwise I would not accept.

VICTOR M ARREY

21 Oct 2019

A few things to take into account: 1, he said he used the impressions as a joke = not a true signature; 2, the signature is supposed to be his name written by him to show he is approving and attesting; 3, has an authorizing government agent approved use of stamp(s) due to infirmity; usually stamps are not allowed as they're not original signatures. To prevent future complications, I would advise, get an amended or duplicate license with legitimate signature and ask for another form of ID, require his real signature before notarizing.

Kelly Roberts

21 Oct 2019

I would first ask if they had another valid form of ID with their signature like a passport. If not I would probably accept the signature as valid. I would probably attempt to call the contact person for the loan package.

Kelly Roberts

21 Oct 2019

I would first ask if they had another valid form of ID with their signature like a passport. If not I would probably accept the signature as valid. I would probably attempt to call the contact person for the loan package.

C Stewart

21 Oct 2019

Because the person said he drew the cats as a joke I would NOT accept it as a form of ID and request another acceptable form and if this person could not present it I would decline and request they reapply for a new ID with a signature that I could match to in my notary journal.

Erica L.

21 Oct 2019

I think I would ask if he's planning to sign all the load docs with 3 cat pictures. If he is, then the ID and signatures/marks match, and we're good to go. If not, I'd ask for another form of ID showing the written signature, and use that instead. I might also ask him to sign a sworn statement that his ID shows cat pictures but he signed these documents with a cursive signature - and have him print and sign his name. Keep that with the book and the loan docs.

Anduin Suchan

21 Oct 2019

If his ID is of the same state as where I was performing the notary, then I would require that he sign the documents the same way (cat heads), provided that the issuer of the documents (assuming they are there) also approve of the cat head signature. If it is not of the same state, I would ask for another ID that matches his (real) signature on the docs. If the issuer of the docs aren't there or don't accept the cat-heads, then I default back to requiring another ID and the real signature. And if it all doesn't work out so smoothly, then I'll just chalk it up to hopefully he/she learns their lesson and stops being cutesy with legal formalities.

Destiny

21 Oct 2019

I am a brand new notary-to-be, and being so I would decline to notarize. While I appreciate quoted definition of “mark” by another commenter, it is my liability on the hook. Because I can decline (based on personal judgement and comfort), I would. It’s better to defend a declination than to argue a litter of cats.

lisa

21 Oct 2019

if his id shows the drawings, that's this legal signature and yes I would accept it

vivienne caldwell

21 Oct 2019

The client’s signature on the loan documents must match their ID. This is the reason we request identifications to verify their signatures to make sure we are servicing the correct person. I would request a different type of ID and if they are unable to provide me with a different ID then I would contact the loan company who gave me the signing and inform them of the situation and how to move forward.

Bev Lazarus

21 Oct 2019

The Signer would be required to produce a State or Federal document indicating that this is the 'manner' in which that person is currently being identified [a sign symbol or a word]

Tammy

21 Oct 2019

the purpose of checking id is to verify that the person before you is really that person. We do this by comparing the picture to the person, looking at the birth year, eye color, height and weight. We also look to see if the name on Id matches name on document. If the signature on Id does not match the name, often times people sign with a squiggle line or in this case cat heads, it is up to the notary to ask the signer to explain the signature. If the answer is satisfactory to the notary then the notary should notarize. If it's not, then the nursery should pass. Can a person sign with cat heads as a legal signature? Actually, they can if that signer had adopted it as his legal signatur ie the symbol otherwise known as Prince legal changed his signature. However, I don't advise doing so. I would notarize the document. In my journal I would have the person sign their name regularly and then also sign aka (drawing if the cat heads).

Blanca

21 Oct 2019

I would ask for a second type of ID. But also, check with the company who began the paperwork process to see if they will accept that ID’s signature.

A Varshney

21 Oct 2019

I will ask for another government ID card and ask for some type of signature on a piece of paper. meantime I will double-check with the NNA hotline.

Grace Walker

21 Oct 2019

There's no state anywhere that allows pictographs for a signature--let alone, on a DL. I would not notarize a document if, the signer, is unable to present a valid and legal form of identification. Maybe the pictograph signature would work for a Notary who lives in Disney's Fantasyland?

Yvonne Coats

21 Oct 2019

as long as it matched 2 forms of ID, it's GTG

ld.notary.signingagent@gmail.com

21 Oct 2019

I would allow it as long as his picture is of the person (not garfield).

Tonia Werneke

21 Oct 2019

The purpose of the ID is to show that he is who he says he is and not to verify his signature. So if there is no question to his identity then I would let him proceed with normal signature or if he wanted to use the cat pictograms I would treat it as a "Mark" signature. Either way, in my Notary Journal I would have him sign his regular signature followed by the pictograms.

gabriela ochoa-martinez

21 Oct 2019

I would accept the ID as is. The actual loan documents need to have a signature, so he would need to sign the documents, i would then have him sign my journal the same way as the loan documents, and if he wants to add the pics he can do that also.

Michael E Harris

21 Oct 2019

Since the state accepted the three cat heads as a legitimate signature, I would accept.

Sharon Chatham

21 Oct 2019

Ask for another form of ID and explain to him that I am not familiar with this type of signature.

Alida Van Meter

21 Oct 2019

I would require the person to sign using the 3 cat faces he used before since this is the mark on his DL (ID used to identify identity). I would also ask him to sign my book using the same cat faces and I would print his name in my book for my reference.

Janis Bottorff

21 Oct 2019

Signers of loan documents are required to sign as it is typed on the documents. As we have 26 recognizable letters in our English language, cats are not one. They would need to sign as the documents indicated. He admitted it was done as a joke thus admitting this is not his actual signature. Require another form of ID with the proper signature, require the signer to sign as such and make a note in the notary journal. The same process should be followed when notarizing a foreign language document....the notarial certificate AND document signature should be in English or a language the Notary can read.

Howard W Bleiwas

21 Oct 2019

This is a question most of us answer on a daily basis. In many loan documents, the lenders require a borrower to sign as the name is printed (e.g.: John Peter Smith v. John Smith), regardless of how it shows on the ID. An even better example is when we have a disabled individual unable to make their normal signature (i.e.: signature by mark). Even more to the point: not too long ago, I had a combat-injured Marine with TBI (Traumatic Brain Injury) causing massive motor-control deficit, who I had to help with filling-in dates, and even getting the pen to the right spot (I generally ask the signer to apply their mark unfettered) Moreover, the duty of the notary, as per the jurat, is to verify that: 1) The undersigned, based on knowledge or proof, is who they claim to be; and 2) That the undersigned executed the document by signature, or made a sworn statement. A notary is not required, and usually not trained, to make admissible comparisons of handwriting/signatures - only to make statements of what they observe (identity and execution of signature). Regardless, I generally call attorney/closing agent/title/lender (as appropriate) for guidance with any discrepancy, and make copious notes in my journal and/or files (again, as appropriate). I also am much more careful if the document is a PoA vs. a routine refi closing. To sum it up: Regardless of what is on the license and the document, once the identity has been verified, a notary can notarize said document if the signer confirms or the notary observes signature (for acknowledgement) or if an oath is accepted (for a sworn statement). Guidance should be sought, if available, and notes should be kept as an aid to memory per FRCP 803(5), routine record per FRCP 803(6) and state equivalents. And, as always, if anything seems the slightest bit hinky, especially with PoA's and disabled signer, one should proceed with extreme care. HWB.

Elaine

21 Oct 2019

The ID is showing their description and picture proof of their identity. My job is to verify their identity, not the signature. The person should sign the documents as his name is printed on them.

Nathan

21 Oct 2019

As long as he/she wasn't trying to sign the documents with his cat symbols I'd be fine accepting the ID. The point of an ID is to identify the person in front of you, and if the picture and description match the person in front of me than I'm fine with the ID. I'd ask him/her to use their normal/real signature. Remember, peoples signature change all the time...over time, and can vary from the ID anyway. Also, signing your name on the DMV electronic pad is often difficult for people and the signatures don't come out the way one wants to begin with.

Jeff Dennis-Strathmeyer

21 Oct 2019

California law does not require that the ID document have a signature if the document is a driver's license or identification care issued by the Department of Motor Vehicles. CA Civil Code 1185(b)(3). So, I would go ahead and notarize the doucment. Same for Passports and Inmate ID Cards. If an alternate form of identification is used it must contain a signature. Civil Code 1185(b)(4).

Jeff Dennis-Strathmeyer

21 Oct 2019

In California there is no requirement that the presented ID document contain a signature if the document is a USA passport or issued by the Department of Motor Vehicles or Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation. Civil Code 1185(b)(3). A signature is required for other documents. Civil Code 1185(b)(4). So I would notarize based on a driver's license signed with cats.

Virginia M. Greene

21 Oct 2019

This is not comical. When dealing with real estate documents and real property this situation could appear years later and bite you in the neck like Dracula. I would demand a second Photo ID with signature, passport Not Discard, or call title and end the closing. How will this be recorded that property is owned by Felix The Cat. Ridiculous

Vicki Nott

21 Oct 2019

I would accept the cat signature. I once had a borrower named Star ⭐️. You guessed it she drew a star on her signature line on all documents and escrow and lender accepted as her signature.

Mavis

21 Oct 2019

I wouldn't accept that ID

Violeta Gutierrez

21 Oct 2019

Thanks for sharing all these information. I would ask the cat to come and sign my journal lol

Brenda

21 Oct 2019

I would take a picture of the id and text it to the lender prior to signing for lender approval.

Natalie

21 Oct 2019

i’m a cat mom so i would like to the cat signature

Debra

21 Oct 2019

So the BIG question which I did not see anyone ask the signer is... IS THIS a true representation of your signature?? (Or mark) Is this how you sign legal documents? He clearly stated it was a JOKE and the DMV let it go thru. SHAME ON THE DMV. As we know... penmanship is NOT what it used to be, cursive handwriting is NOT being taught in school and many text or type all day and e sign with no real pen in hand. If a true signature represents the signer and how they would normally sign then the answer is yes, accept. If the signer can recreate this and sign checks for documents as they would in a regular normal signing situation for the coming years then you have the answer. A signature is SERIOUS, it is an acknowledgement. Signers forget this and just chicken scratch so often and also are hurried and take the chance for a rejection. Sometimes just a simple explanation and statement on will you remember this signature on your next set of legal documents is helpful. JMO

Jacqueline

21 Oct 2019

I would ask for multiple identifications WITH the correct signature. If there are no others, I would contact the title company and explain the situation to see if they are in acceptance of the identification as well as the signature. If title were not available, I would contact the company who assigned me to the client and ask them how they would like me to proceed. I would make copies of ALL identification and ask the client to sign the paperwork AND my journal with their regular signature AND the cat signature.

Marjorie

21 Oct 2019

I would call the hotline and the company I am doing the notarizing for and advise them if the situation. If they can sign with matching cats like on their ID I would think it is similar to signing with an X

Valerie Sharp

21 Oct 2019

I believe this might fall under the person signing the document by a mark: if that is the case, the signature must be witnessed by two people who must also sign their own names as witnesses on the document as well as sign the journal. The witness must write the persons name next to the mark. I would also make a note in my journal about the unique circumstances and keep a photo copy of cat-mans ID just in case.

Jamie Guillen

21 Oct 2019

I wouldn't accept it and I would ask for a 2nd ID or refer him to another notary public.

Jamie Guillen

21 Oct 2019

I wouldn't accept it and I would ask for a 2nd ID or refer him to another notary public.

Matthew Stewart

21 Oct 2019

First, I’d see if someone I knew and trusted would validate the identity of this person. Other than that I would ask for another form of ID, preferably a passport. If neither, then I don’t think I’d feel comfortable notarizing the signature.

Tami Schwab

21 Oct 2019

I would ask for another government issued ID.

Paulette Wellborn

21 Oct 2019

I sign my name with a for and aI curved line in my p to make it look like a smile with an eye. I signed my drivers license like that. I go by the true legal documents thAt contains Mark's, faces and if a cat head is on the signature line of the drivers license, passport or other recognized ID. Then that is what iI go by

Candi Rosenthal

21 Oct 2019

I would assume that the bank is already aware of this and I have given me instructions regarding this. In the event I don’t have any instructions I would reach out to title first it would most likely then reach out to the lender or if they directed me to reach out to the lender I would do that I would also in the interim have asked him for another piece of photo ID if available such as a passport or social security card

Barbara Jones

21 Oct 2019

Ask for another pictured I,d

Noah Wood

21 Oct 2019

I would humor him by making him sign the document and my journal as shown on his ID, after I verified the ID was real of course. It doesn't really matter what mark is used, just that the signer willingly made a mark and was of sound mind to do so. I would also collect a fingerprint just in case

Michael Ruo

21 Oct 2019

If an official agency issued an official ID with cat heads as the signature and the signer signs the document in front of me the exact same way, I would notarize it. However I would caution the signer that the bank/mortgage company might not accept it.

Steve

21 Oct 2019

laugh and say have a great day BYE

Kathleen Lippiatt

21 Oct 2019

Not sure! I like the answer to produce another picture id.

Mary boyce

21 Oct 2019

I can just picture the county clerk's face when she?he gets a mortgage to record with cat heads as a signature! lol I would have the person sign both ways and produce an ID with his actual signature. I hate to believe that an actual DMV of any state USA would accept this what's next dogs!

Catherine Zukwoski

21 Oct 2019

I would ask for another form of acceptable ID for the State of CA. If signer was unable to provide another form of acceptable ID, I would call the NNA for advice. My inclination would be to refuse to notarize until proper ID is produced.

Deanna Cagle

21 Oct 2019

Ok- So as a notary we are there to confirm the borrower is who they say they are AND to watch them sign in front of us. So I don't know that I'd be matching signatures on the ID- I'd be looking at the photo and name and then I'd be looking at the legal document to make sure the names match. (To be safe I would most likely ask for additional ID / Thumb print and I might call the 800# but, if the signing is at 8pm we may not be able to get ahold of anyone.

Reenae Jones

21 Oct 2019

Tell them to add cat nip to the grocery list because clearly they’re out! No, no, just kidding. I’m always respected to clients. I just couldn’t resist. I would definitely ask for another form of ID, along with calling the NNA and my contact.

Stacey Rodgers

21 Oct 2019

I would accept the identification as is. Im only verifying the person's identity and making sure the identification is not expired. It would be the same as if the person just signed a big X for their signature.

Sheila Ransome

21 Oct 2019

I would use the three Cats like his ID

Candice Angotti

21 Oct 2019

Has anyone fact checked this story? I tried and it was never verified or denied.

Victoria E Watts

22 Oct 2019

In a loan signing agent capacity, IF the person insists on using the "cat signature" I would contact the title or escrow company to inform them of the situation and see what THEY want me to do. If this is a general notary job, I would request that they not use the cat signature if there is nothing prohibiting them from signing in the normal manner. Just because DMV didn't speak up doesn't mean I wouldn't.

carol mahoney

22 Oct 2019

I would have them put their fingerprint in my Notary Journal.

Theodore M.

22 Oct 2019

I believe the fact that he did it as a joke. I DON'T believe for a second that the state accepted it. Having been a Police Officer for 30 years on the streets of New York, I have a natural skepticism for people like this. I would refuse the signing, wave "Bye-Bye, and leave.

VANESSA

22 Oct 2019

but his signature on his ID is a series of pictures instead of a regular handwritten signature. Do you feel comfortable accepting this ID? No; it's not normal. I would ask for more proof, or docs to be proof. Is it OK for the borrower to sign the loan documents with a regular handwritten signature when his ID shows a different type of signature? NO, they must be the same. Or does the borrower’s signature on the loan document have to match the signature appearing on his license? Yes, with a few exceptions. What would you do in this situation? Come prepared with proper documentation and different IDs for proof

Christy Hayes

22 Oct 2019

This kind of "Frivolous Penmanship" needs to stop. I am fine with the pre-made signature stamp of a person real signature--but just like people can't be legally named a "number"..and signature is a signature not an IMOGI.

Rosemarie Helen Miller

22 Oct 2019

I would accept it.

Phyllis Holzderber

22 Oct 2019

I would make the person sign with the cat heads and his regular signature next to them.

Jan Myers

22 Oct 2019

We are not handwriting experts, if the "signature" on the government issued State ID is signed that way then who am I to question it. And we are not verifying the person's signature, only the their identity. Because if that were the case I would have problems with every signature, because they don't look like anything at times. So what is the difference between the Cats or a straight line as a signature?

Roger Waterhouse

22 Oct 2019

In this particular case he said it was meant to be a joke. So obviously this is not his actual mark or signature.. I would ask for another form of ID like a pass port that has his signature.

Vanessa M. Rodriguez

22 Oct 2019

I wouldn't accept the DL as a form of ID and I'd request another acceptable form of ID. If they could not provide, I would decline the notarization.

carmen

22 Oct 2019

I would think that if the motor vehicle allowed for him to sign this way, then it is a proper form of signature or we also don't know if that person is illiterate as well.

Eleanor Solano

22 Oct 2019

I would ask for two forms of ID , and make a copy of his DL and Keep in the journal, but have him sign the document with a signature not the cats!

Deborah Camara

22 Oct 2019

Yes, I would accept the signature as it matches the signature on the acceptable form of ID. Possibly ask for a second form of ID to be sure.

dwhitford@financialguide.com

22 Oct 2019

I would accept the ID. His name is printed on the state approved ID, and his picture is on the ID. If he does not look like the picture, then I would ask for a second ID.

Doug Staton

22 Oct 2019

If that's the signature on his ID, then that is his legal signature. It's not up to me to say he can't sign with his legal signature. That's why we have a Signature/Name Affidavit in the package.

Elaine

22 Oct 2019

I would ask for a second ID, and I would have him sign the documents and Notary book with both the cats and signature from another ID.

Mia Lindsay

23 Oct 2019

Number 1: How did they let this go through as a signature on a government ID? Number 2: I would ask for another form of ID and I would reach out to the lender and attorney to advise of my findings. Number 3: This is a loan signing and he's gotten this far...In this circumstance, I may be able to notarize the signer's signature on a written statement, that I would then certify so that the loan signing could commence. If both lender and attorney agree to allow. Number 4: Complete and seal an APA (All Purpose Acknowledgement) attesting to the identity of the signer and attach to the loan documents, expressly identifying that document and its specific number of pages.

Mia Lindsay

23 Oct 2019

Update to my first response: Hmmm...Number 1: How did they let this go through as a signature on a government ID? Number 2: I would ask for another form of ID and I would reach out to the lender and attorney to advise of my findings and proceed as advised. Number 3: This is a loan signing and he's gotten this far...In this circumstance, I MAY be able to notarize the signer's signature on a written statement, that I would then certify so that the loan signing could commence. (If both lender and attorney agree to allow). Number 4: Complete and seal an APA (All Purpose Acknowledgement) attesting to the identity of the signer and attach it to the loan documents, expressly identifying that document and its specific number of pages... OR Treat the signature, like an X signing, after verifying the signer's identity. Writing underneath the "cat signature" "Mark affixed by (name of signer by mark) in presence of undersigned notary", then complete and seal an APA.

John Mc Elhenny

23 Oct 2019

well you must use your name so I would ask for some other form of ID with the person's legal name on it to go forward with the signing

Janet

24 Oct 2019

If the signature on the ID doesn't reasonably match the signature on the document, which it wouldn't in this case, I would ask for another form of ID.

TX Voter

24 Oct 2019

A signature does not have to be the person's name. A person can change their signature at any time. A "signature" could be an "x". The artist formerly known as prince had--via a legal name change, a character embedded in his name. The purpose of a signature is for the person to indicate, in written form, his/her intent to be committed to the substance of the document. That intent can be expressed in any form, except if that form is someone else's name.

Joe L. Lopez

24 Oct 2019

I would ask the signer to sign my journal with his/her signature and the cat pictures on the driver's license. Also, ask the signer for a second form of ID where I can verify his/her signature. Have the signer sign the documents as he would sign any other legal document.

Mary Pfeiffer

24 Oct 2019

I find it hard to believe a government agency would accept this as a signature because he will have issues with it in a lot of different situations. Would love to be the fly on the wall when a cop pulls him over and they see three cat heads as his signature.

Cynthia Benoit

25 Oct 2019

I have come across a similar situation with a foreigner who also signed his name with a mark. I had him sign his mark and his full legal name on the document to cover all bases

Nadine Gomez

25 Oct 2019

This is not his legal name so it is an error on the DMV. I would ask him to get a new DMV with his real legal name so he can sign a legal document and to stop waiting everyone's time with his jokes.

April H.

25 Oct 2019

The only hesitation that I would have is that the signer "meant it as a joke". In that specific case, I would defer to a Passport. If no other acceptible ID is present, I would note the issue and his stmt in my Notary journal and proceed with the signing only if he used three cat heads on the document (as this is the only "signature" I could verify. If the signer agreed, I would scan his ID to my encrypted drop box (in case my act was questioned later) and would definitely tell him that if it were me, I'd check with DMV to ensure that my 'joke' didn't get me in trouble.

Irma pfeffer

25 Oct 2019

I would like to see another I'd using the same. Or you could ask for a witness to confirm who he is. Such as a credible witness

Tanya Lundy-Freeman

26 Oct 2019

I would accept the signature, if and only if, she/he was able to produce another form of ID, such as drivers license, passport, that had the same type signature. If the animals were different - its a no. They would have to be the exact same animals, in the same order. This would then be noted in my journal.

Rickey Jackson

26 Oct 2019

When I read the article on Cat Heads, red flags popped-up. An issue for me would be "Is the person competent." Because with his own words “I signed using cat heads instead of a normal signature when I renewed my license,” “I meant it as a joke, but they let it through” he's admitting to a crime. I would not feel comfortable moving forward with having him sign the loan documents. This person thought it was a joke signing his state-issued ID (which is a critical document) with cat faces. After asking if he knew a regular handwritten signature was required; I would inform that I can't use the ID because it's not a valid form of ID. I would report back to the loan company on the issue, and let them decide on how to move forward. As a Notary I would be responsible for confirming awareness; simply put, I would base my action on the signer’s ability to understand what has happened (falsifying his Id). And, let the signer know that his awareness is in doubt and that the loan company will be in contact.

Krystal Dawn Stevens

28 Oct 2019

I would ask if he has another form of ID like a passport. If he does or doesn't I would still allow him to sign with the cat heads but would require a signature as well. I would have him sign the same way in my ledger & in the comments I would note this. I believe if the DMV allowed this then why should I refuse him.

Teri Grant

28 Oct 2019

You are not verifying the signer's signature when notarizing a document, you are verifying that the person signing or marking the document is the person that they are presenting themselves as in the document. A signature by a "mark" is acceptable; however, in California the signer will need 2 witnesses who can verify that the person making the mark is the person who is presenting themselves as in the document. Then what the notary public is verifying is that those witnesses, by virtue of credible identification, are who they are.

Ruby Glass

28 Oct 2019

I would ask for another form of government issued identification. I would not notarize based on the id they provided. Anyone can draw a picture.

Curtis W Perdue

29 Oct 2019

^The individual who presented the signature of cats stated "He meant it as a joke" therefore the signature presented is a JOKE! Your true (or real) signature is unique. It is also your public face. It represents you on important documents, on messages to friends: it is your mark of promise and your bond. I would ask for the individuals ID that is not a joke.

mh.wolfy@hotmail.com

29 Oct 2019

I would tell him that we need to reschedule this until he can bring someone who knows him and that they have a valid ID that has their signature. As he had stated that he did the 3 cat heads as a joke. And that he should go back to the DMV and get that corrected.

Tauheedah A Rahim

01 Nov 2019

I would ask him for a photo ID, and ask him to sign his name over the Cat Pictures as it appears on the photo ID that he presented to me.

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