Your Cookies are Disabled! NationalNotary.org sets cookies on your computer to help improve performance and provide a more engaging user experience. By using this site, you accept the terms of our cookie policy. Learn more.

FAQ: Moral Turpitude Crimes That Disqualify Notaries

family-court-resized.jpgUpdated 5-10-21. In some states, a conviction for a crime of moral turpitude will prevent a person from getting a Notary commission or result in an existing Notary losing their commission — but it isn’t exactly clear what moral turpitude means. Here are answers to questions Notaries have asked about moral turpitude and offenses that can disqualify a Notary from holding a commission.

What Is ‘Moral Turpitude’?

According to Merriam-Webster, “moral turpitude” has two legal meanings:

1.  An act or behavior that gravely violates the sentiment or accepted standard of the community.

2.  A quality of dishonesty or other immorality that is determined by a court to be present in the commission of a criminal offense.

What Do State Notary Laws Say About Moral Turpitude?

Notaries witness the execution of document signings. In general terms, a person cannot be trusted to perform Notary services impartially and honestly if they have been convicted of a crime that involves moral turpitude. In some states persons convicted of crimes of moral turpitude may be disqualified from applying for a Notary commission.

Moral turpitude as applied to Notary laws seldom has an exact definition. It is a concept that gives state commissioning authorities wide flexibility in deciding whether someone should receive or keep a Notary commission.

Not every state lists moral turpitude in its Notary laws as a disqualification for a Notary commission, but many do. North Carolina authorizes the Secretary of State to deny a Notary commission to an individual who has been convicted of any crime involving “dishonesty or moral turpitude” (GS 10B-5[d][2]). Arizona disqualifies any person convicted of a crime “involving moral turpitude or of a nature that is incompatible with the duties of a notary public” (ARS 41-330.A.2).

California law states moral turpitude as grounds for the denial, suspension or revocation of a commission (Government Code 8214.1[b]). The California Secretary of State’s Notary Public Disciplinary Guidelines lists examples of offenses of moral turpitude that can lead to revocation of a Notary’s commission or denial of a commission application. The examples include but are not limited to: assault, arson, auto theft, burglary, possession or sale of illegal drugs, embezzlement, forgery, fraud, failure to pay child support or failure to comply with a court order. The California Supreme Court has handled many cases in which crimes of moral turpitude were at issue. In one case, the Court said, “Although we have variously defined ‘moral turpitude’ in such broad terms as ‘baseness, vileness or depravity’…, we have also decided that the question of whether a conviction involves moral turpitude so as to warrant revocation or suspension of a license to practice a professional cannot be determined in the abstract but depends rather on whether the conviction demonstrates unfitness to practice that profession” (Cartwright v. Board of Chiropractic Examiners, 16 Cal. 3d 762, 548 P.2d 1134, 129 Cal. Rptr. 462, 1976 Cal. LEXIS 258).

Under Texas law, “a crime involving moral turpitude includes dishonesty, fraud, deceit, misrepresentation, deliberate violence, moral depravity, or that reflects adversely on the applicant's honesty, trustworthiness, or fitness as a notary public …” (1 TAC 87.10 [c]). Crimes involving moral turpitude include felony or Class A or B type misdemeanor convictions.

In short, the legal definition of moral turpitude is fuzzy around the edges. It may be hard to define, but it comes into clearer focus when you consider individual offenses that demonstrate the unfitness of the individual to perform official duties, in this case being a Notary Public.

What About Notary Laws In Other States?

States that do not have moral turpitude provisions in their Notary laws may still disqualify persons convicted of certain crimes from serving as Notaries. For example, Florida disqualifies any Notary commission applicants who have been convicted of a felony unless the applicant has had his or her civil rights restored. Florida Notaries may also have their commissions suspended for fraud, unauthorized practice of law or other types of misconduct (FS 117.01).

David Thun is an Associate Editor at the National Notary Association. 

View All: Laws & Regulations

184 Comments

Add your comment

Dave Briggman

19 Aug 2019

You guys should be aware that in Virginia, felons who have had their rights restored can be commissioned as Notaries...in one company, I found four Notaries who were convicted felons, some of who had Notarized documents I found improperly. In response, I asked my State Senator to introduce legislation to bar all felons who have had their rights restored from becoming Notaries, which he carried. He then amended his bill to limit the ban to those felons having been convicted of crime of moral turpitude (lying, cheating, or stealing), which he did. The legislation passed unanimously out of the Senate and 87-12 out of the House, http://leg1.state.va.us/cgi-bin/legp504.exe?191 sum SB1782 The Governor of Virginia then vetoed the bill, which even if passed, would have still allowed felons who have murdered, raped, and committed other major crimes from becoming Notaries in Virginia. https://www.governor.virginia.gov/newsroom/all-releases/2019/march/headline-839694-en.html

Michael Harris

19 Aug 2019

In today's climate of sexual sin, many crimes of moral turpitude are no longer crimes (now the norm).

Mr. J

12 Sep 2019

Actually Michael Harris, with much greater social awareness of sexual improprieties, including the #metoo movement, people DON'T get away with sexual assault and harassment the way that they used to. Look how things have turned out for certain big-name celebrities over the last couple of years when their immoral behavior has finally come to light after many years.

Sheila

06 Aug 2020

I was wondering about the state of Mississippi and their interpretation of the law. Can a person with a felony for possession with intent be disqualified?

National Notary Association

07 Aug 2020

Hello. You can find a list of disqualifying felonies in Mississippi under Rule 1.8 in this document: https://www.sos.ms.gov/content/documents/Business/Notary%20rules%20and%20regs.pdf

Jim

08 Aug 2020

I got convicted of a felony DWI in 2010 in the state of Texas. I paid my debt to society and have been a productive and law-abiding citizen since then. I am starting an income tax preparation business and would like to know if I would be able to acquire a Notary commission. Any advice would be greatly appreciated. Thank you and God bless.

National Notary Association

12 Aug 2020

Hello. To qualify for a Texas Notary commission, an applicant must not have been convicted of a felony or crime of moral turpitude (GC 406.004[a]).

Holly Doering

22 Aug 2020

How far back do background checks go? If someone has had a felony or misdemeanor that falls in the description of "moral turpitude", but it was over 30 years ago, will it still disqualify? For California

National Notary Association

24 Aug 2020

Hello. A California Notary applicant is required on the application form under penalty of perjury to list all convictions by any court of a misdemeanor, or a felony, and provide all details for any arrest or citation for an offense for which a trial is pending.

Sarah Jarboe

06 Oct 2020

Hi there! If you had a simple drug possession charge over 5 years ago and thats the only thing have ever been in trouble for, will that count against you? Thanks!

National Notary Association

08 Oct 2020

Hello. To help us answer your question, can you please tell us what state you wish to apply for a Notary commission in?

chevy@sandiferlawoffice.com

12 Oct 2020

With the State of Texas current law, any felony conviction period or a moral turpitude crime disqualifies you from being a notary. Could you tell me the states that have any clause to this such as time period or rights restored.

National Notary Association

19 Oct 2020

Hello. We contacted a law professor who is an expert on Notary law with your question. He is not aware of any state Notary statutes that provide the type of clause you describe, but recommends contacting a specific state for additional information if you have questions about this matter.

Sage sage

12 Oct 2020

Texas I was convicted of a felony that’s was dropped down to a class A misdemeanor in 2013 . i completed 2 years Of Deferred adjudication and it was dropped . Can i be approved

National Notary Association

16 Oct 2020

“A crime involving moral turpitude includes the commission of a crime involving dishonesty, fraud, deceit, misrepresentation, deliberate violence, moral depravity, or that reflects adversely on the applicant’s honesty, trustworthiness, or fitness as a notary public, which may include, but not be limited to: (1) Class A and B type misdemeanors which have not been set aside, or for which no pardon or certificate of restoration of citizenship rights have been granted; and (2) felony convictions which have not been set aside, or for which no pardon or certificate of restoration of citizenship rights have been granted” (1 TAC 87.10[c]). “Class C type misdemeanor convictions shall not be considered in determining eligibility” (1 TAC 87.10[d]). If you need additional information about your individual situation, we recommend contacting the TX Secretary of State's office at 1-512-463-5705.

Tammy Lee

13 Oct 2020

I had a marijuana possession charge in Texas 6 or 7 years ago that was dismissed after probation in Texas. Can I become a Texas notary?

National Notary Association

16 Oct 2020

Hello. “A person is not eligible to be a notary public if the person was convicted of a crime involving moral turpitude or a felony and the conviction has become final, has not been set aside, and no pardon or certificate of restoration of citizenship rights has been granted” (1 TAC 87.10[b]). “A crime involving moral turpitude includes the commission of a crime involving dishonesty, fraud, deceit, misrepresentation, deliberate violence, moral depravity, or that reflects adversely on the applicant’s honesty, trustworthiness, or fitness as a notary public, which may include, but not be limited to: (1) Class A and B type misdemeanors which have not been set aside, or for which no pardon or certificate of restoration of citizenship rights have been granted; and (2) felony convictions which have not been set aside, or for which no pardon or certificate of restoration of citizenship rights have been granted” (1 TAC 87.10[c]). “Class C type misdemeanor convictions shall not be considered in determining eligibility” (1 TAC 87.10[d]). If you are not sure about your qualification status, you may wish to contact the TX Secretary of State's office directly to speak with someone directly about your status. Their phone number is 1-512-463-5705

Francisco

17 Oct 2020

If I had a dui in Pennsylvania. Could I still become a notary? What information should I put on the app?

National Notary Association

19 Oct 2020

Hello. You can find a list of disqualifying acts at the PA Department of State's website here: https://www.dos.pa.gov/OtherServices/Notaries/NotaryServices/Pages/Character-Criminal-Convictions-and-Sanctions-RULONA.aspx. If you are not sure if you fall under one of these categories or need additional instructions for completing the Notary application, please contact the Department of State by phone at 1-717-787-5280 or by email at ST-NOTARIES@pa.gov to request assistance.

Dora

22 Oct 2020

I was convicted over 30yrs ago for shoplifting and aggravated assault but given a expungement. Would that disqualify me from a Notary public position in TN?

National Notary Association

22 Oct 2020

Hello. No one may serve as a Tennessee Notary who: (a) has been convicted of bribery, larceny or certain other offenses unless restored to citizenship (TCA 8-18-101). We would suggest contacting the Tennessee Department of State's Notary Section directly to confirm whether or not you are eligible to apply. Their number is 1-615-741-2650 and email is TNSOS.MVTL@tn.gov.

lisa

29 Oct 2020

If I had a Class B misdemeanor (bad check) charge, completed my probation would this disqualify me? Texas

National Notary Association

29 Oct 2020

“A crime involving moral turpitude includes the commission of a crime involving dishonesty, fraud, deceit, misrepresentation, deliberate violence, moral depravity, or that reflects adversely on the applicant’s honesty, trustworthiness, or fitness as a notary public, which may include, but not be limited to: (1) Class A and B type misdemeanors which have not been set aside, or for which no pardon or certificate of restoration of citizenship rights have been granted; and (2) felony convictions which have not been set aside, or for which no pardon or certificate of restoration of citizenship rights have been granted” (1 TAC 87.10[c]).

Joe

30 Oct 2020

Will a class A misdemeanor of endangering the welfare of a child disqualify me from becoming a notary in NY?

National Notary Association

02 Nov 2020

Hello. NY Notary applicants must not have been convicted of a crime, unless the Secretary of State makes a finding in conformance with all applicable statutory requirements, including those contained in Correction Law Article 23-A, that such convictions do not constitute a bar to appointment.

Lindsay

30 Oct 2020

I have a previous theft misdemeanor in ky but I want to be a notary in Ohio. Will the old charge in ky be held against me.

National Notary Association

02 Nov 2020

Hello. Ohio Notary applicants must submit a criminal records check report demonstrating that the applicant has not been convicted of or pleaded guilty or no contest to a disqualifying offense, or any offense under an existing or former law of Ohio, any other state, or the United States that is substantially equivalent to such a disqualifying offense within 6 months prior to application (ORC 147.01[B]). A list of disqualifying offenses can be found here: https://codes.ohio.gov/orc/4776.10

Kevin Battles

02 Nov 2020

I had a misdemeanor family assault in 1996 and completed anger management, probation? And 84 hours community service. I applied for a notary license and I was denied. It’s been 24 yrs and I have not been in any trouble since then why am I help accountable for something that happen so long ago when I was young. I completed what the court required of me. I should have all rights restored we all make mistakes nobody is perfect and we’ll make mistakes some get caught up in mistakes and others don’t . What recourse do I have to fight and get my license

National Notary Association

02 Nov 2020

Hello. State Notary regulating agencies typically have the authority to approve or reject a Notary commission application based on the requirements in state Notary statute. Can you tell us what state you are applying for a commission in?

Kevin Battles

02 Nov 2020

Texas

National Notary Association

02 Nov 2020

Texas statute lists the following information on disqualifications for Notary commission applicants: “A person is not eligible to be a notary public if the person was convicted of a crime involving moral turpitude or a felony and the conviction has become final, has not been set aside, and no pardon or certificate of restoration of citizenship rights has been granted” (1 TAC 87.10[b]). “A crime involving moral turpitude includes the commission of a crime involving dishonesty, fraud, deceit, misrepresentation, deliberate violence, moral depravity, or that reflects adversely on the applicant’s honesty, trustworthiness, or fitness as a notary public, which may include, but not be limited to: (1) Class A and B type misdemeanors which have not been set aside, or for which no pardon or certificate of restoration of citizenship rights have been granted; and (2) felony convictions which have not been set aside, or for which no pardon or certificate of restoration of citizenship rights have been granted” (1 TAC 87.10[c]). “Class C type misdemeanor convictions shall not be considered in determining eligibility” (1 TAC 87.10[d]).

newbie

03 Nov 2020

Can a convicted felon of fraud & forgery in the state of GA have their rights restored and become a notary?

National Notary Association

10 Nov 2020

A Georgia Notary commission may be denied by the clerk of the superior court due to: (a) the applicant’s criminal history; (b) revocation, suspension or restriction of any Notary commission or professional license in any state; (c) commission of any of the prohibited acts listed in OCGA 45-17-15(a); or (d) a finding by the Georgia Bar or any court that the applicant engaged in the unauthorized practice of law (GNH).

Rashaunda Kenney

04 Nov 2020

If your record has been sealed for class b misdemeanor shoplifting can you become a notary for Texas?

National Notary Association

10 Nov 2020

“A person is not eligible to be a notary public if the person was convicted of a crime involving moral turpitude or a felony and the conviction has become final, has not been set aside, and no pardon or certificate of restoration of citizenship rights has been granted” (1 TAC 87.10[b]). “A crime involving moral turpitude includes the commission of a crime involving dishonesty, fraud, deceit, misrepresentation, deliberate violence, moral depravity, or that reflects adversely on the applicant’s honesty, trustworthiness, or fitness as a notary public, which may include, but not be limited to: (1) Class A and B type misdemeanors which have not been set aside, or for which no pardon or certificate of restoration of citizenship rights have been granted; and (2) felony convictions which have not been set aside, or for which no pardon or certificate of restoration of citizenship rights have been granted” (1 TAC 87.10[c]). “Class C type misdemeanor convictions shall not be considered in determining eligibility” (1 TAC 87.10[d]).

Jordan

10 Nov 2020

I wish to apply to become a notary in Michigan. I have an OWI from 2014, and want to know if that will hold me back from being able to become a notary.

National Notary Association

10 Nov 2020

Hello. To qualify for a MI Notary commission, an applicant must be free of any felony convictions within the past 10 years, two or more "specified misdemeanors" within a 12-month period while commissioned as a Notary or three or more "specified misdemeanors" within a five-year-period. The term “specified misdemeanors” is to be determined by the Michigan Secretary of State and includes the following: a violation of the Michigan Notary Public Act; a violation of the public trust; an act of official misconduct, dishonesty, fraud or deceit; or an act substantially related to the duties or responsibilities of a notary public [MCL 55.301].

Becca Valenzuela

10 Nov 2020

Can being listed on a child abuse registry show on a background check or keep someone from becoming a notary for the state of TN? No convictions or charges at all.

National Notary Association

13 Nov 2020

Hello. No one may serve as a Tennessee Notary who has been convicted of bribery, larceny or certain other offenses unless restored to citizenship. You may wish to contact the Tennessee Department of State directly at 1-615-741-2650 to discuss your legal situation and determine if it would disqualify you from holding a commission.

frank d

15 Nov 2020

I had completed an ARD program in Pennsylvania for a DUI in 2001 , which is considered no conviction , I would like to become a NY state Notary would this cause any issues ?

National Notary Association

17 Nov 2020

Hello. An applicant for a commission as a New York Notary Public must: (a) be at least 18 years old, (b) be a person of good moral character, (c) be a resident of New York State or have an office or place of business in the state, (d) have the equivalent of a “common school education” and (e) not have been convicted of a crime, unless the Secretary of State makes a finding in conformance with all applicable statutory requirements, including those contained in Correction Law Article 23-A, that such convictions do not constitute a bar to appointment.

Ward Bell

18 Nov 2020

How can a felon in California become a notary?

National Notary Association

18 Nov 2020

Hello. According to the CA Secretary of State's website (https://www.sos.ca.gov/notary/qualifications), state law requires all applicants be fingerprinted as part of a background check prior to being granted an appointment as a notary public. All applicants are required to disclose on their application any arrests for which trial is pending and all convictions. The Secretary of State will recommend denial of an application for the following reasons: Failure to disclose any arrest or conviction; Conviction of a felony where not less than 10 years have passed since the completion of probation; Conviction of a disqualifying misdemeanor where not less than 5 years have passed since the completion of probation; or A determination that the facts of a particular case warrant denial, such as the nature and severity of the act or the presence of aggravating factors.

Emma W

19 Nov 2020

Wish to apply to become a notary in Oregon but want to know if a criminal mischief plus a dui charge will get me denied. I completed the diversion program and everything required by the courts.

National Notary Association

20 Nov 2020

Hello. To qualify for an Oregon Notary commission, an applicant must not have been convicted of a felony or any crime involving fraud, dishonesty or deceit during the 10-year period preceding the date of application.

chelsea@pcwelldrilling.com

19 Nov 2020

Can you become a CA Notary if you had a felony in 2010, probation completed in 2015 and expunged from your record in 2020?

National Notary Association

20 Nov 2020

Hello. California Notary commission applicants must pass a background check by both the FBI and the California Department of Justice, including submission of fingerprints (GC 8201.1[a] through [d]). A list of disqualifying convictions is available online at https://www.sos.ca.gov/notary/qualifications. If you are concerned your status might affect your ability to pass a background check, you should contact the CA SOS office by email here (https://www.sos.ca.gov/notary/contact/email-notary-public-and-apostille) to ask about your qualification concerns.

Alecia Lyle

03 Dec 2020

I am in Pennsylvania and have had a felony over 10 years, would I be able to become a notary?

National Notary Association

04 Dec 2020

Hello. Under 57 Pa.C.S. 323, a Notary commission application may be denied if the applicant has been convicted of a felony involving fraud, dishonesty or deceit.

Mylessa Butler

05 Dec 2020

Hi I’m from NC and I have a felony with and assault with a deadly weapon on probation till 2023 will I be able to become a notary

National Notary Association

11 Dec 2020

“A notary public may not hold public office if he or she: • Has been convicted of a felony under North Carolina or federal law. • Has been convicted of a felony in another state that is also considered a felony under North Carolina law. • Has been convicted of corruption or malpractice in any office. • Has been removed from any office by impeachment. “All of these constitutional disqualifications prevent anyone from holding the office of notary public if his or her citizenship rights have not been restored in the manner prescribed by law. However, individuals who have been incarcerated or placed on probation are able to submit an application for consideration provided that 10 years have passed since the applicant’s last day of prison, parole, or probation. G.S. 10B-5(d)(2)”

Gerald

09 Dec 2020

What type of background check is pulled in NC? Is it just state level or both federal and state.

National Notary Association

10 Dec 2020

“A notary public may not hold public office if he or she: • Has been convicted of a felony under North Carolina or federal law. • Has been convicted of a felony in another state that is also considered a felony under North Carolina law. • Has been convicted of corruption or malpractice in any office. • Has been removed from any office by impeachment. “All of these constitutional disqualifications prevent anyone from holding the office of notary public if his or her citizenship rights have not been restored in the manner prescribed by law. However, individuals who have been incarcerated or placed on probation are able to submit an application for consideration provided that 10 years have passed since the applicant’s last day of prison, parole, or probation. G.S. 10B-5(d)(2)”

Lisa

09 Dec 2020

I was arrested in 1990 for a misdemeanor disturbing the peace and again in 1998 a misdemeanor fraud i was with someone who had a credit card that didn't belong to them by me being with them I got charge the same charges will this affect me from becoming a notary?

National Notary Association

10 Dec 2020

Hello. What state do you wish to apply for a commission in?

Amber

11 Dec 2020

I have a dismissed case of Petit Larceny (not convicted)will this affect my renewal of my notarization?

National Notary Association

11 Dec 2020

Hello. To answer your question, we would need to know the state you wish to apply for a commission in, please.

Medinah Harris

13 Dec 2020

I was convicted with an "Aggravated assault" charge in 1992, I was 18...I had a fight in school, and received 12 months "court supervision" and besides minor traffic tickets, I have been in the court system since...I now live in MN and after having my records reviewed, I was able to obtain a license as an Insurance Agent. I believe that is because they offer a chance to have your records reviewed. So, I noticed that there is a place on the MN notary application that allows for a consideration of records. Is it possible that I will have any success in obtaining a Notary public in the state of MN, and I would also be interested in becoming a notary in IL, and MO, and texas. What would you all say? Also, even if the a person obtains a Notary from the "state" does that mean they still may not obtain background approval from the NNA?

National Notary Association

15 Dec 2020

Hello. Your comment includes separate questions with different answers. First, as a Minnesota resident, you are not eligible to apply for an Illinois or Texas Notary commission, and could only apply for a Missouri commission if you have a place of business within that state. Second, in Minnesota, applicants may be required to submit a criminal background check form if the applicant has certain past criminal or civil actions against them. You may need to contact the Minnesota Secretary of State's office directly to ask questions about your record that may affect your Notary application. (https://notary.sos.state.mn.us). Last, if you are referring to the Notary Signing Agent certification and background screening offered by the NNA, the background screening uses standards developed by the Signing Professionals Workgroup, including a "points" system where certain offenses on a subjects record deduct points from a total score, and if the score drops below a certain amount, the subject is disqualified for Signing Agent certification. For more information, please see here: https://signingprofessionalsworkgroup.org/background-screening-standards/

Shykeya Anderson

30 Dec 2020

Hello! Do traffic ticket or parking ticket get you disqualified to become a notary in North Carolina?

National Notary Association

30 Dec 2020

Hello. The Secretary of State may deny an application for commission or recommission based on “(t)he applicant’s conviction or plea of admission or nolo contendere to a felony or any crime involving dishonesty or moral turpitude. In no case may a commission be issued to an applicant within 10 years after release from prison, probation, or parole, whichever is later” (GS 10B-5[d][2]). “A notary public may not hold public office if he or she: • Has been convicted of a felony under North Carolina or federal law. • Has been convicted of a felony in another state that is also considered a felony under North Carolina law. • Has been convicted of corruption or malpractice in any office. • Has been removed from any office by impeachment. “All of these constitutional disqualifications prevent anyone from holding the office of notary public if his or her citizenship rights have not been restored in the manner prescribed by law. However, individuals who have been incarcerated or placed on probation are able to submit an application for consideration provided that 10 years have passed since the applicant’s last day of prison, parole, or probation. G.S. 10B-5(d)(2)”

frank howard waters

31 Dec 2020

hello. i am a california resident. 31 years ago, i was convicted of possession of heroin. i successfully completed probation and drug treatment. i got clean a year later, and have been free of all drugs/alcohol for nearly 30 years. i continue to be very active in the recovery community. i have held several sensitive jobs, working on military bases, the va, social security buildings, etc. can i become a notary?

National Notary Association

06 Jan 2021

Hello. CA Notary commission applicants must pass a background check by both the FBI and the California Department of Justice, including submission of fingerprints (GC 8201.1[a]). If you have specific personal circumstances that you are concerned may affect your commission eligibility, we recommend emailing the California Secretary of State's Notary Public section to speak with them directly: https://www.sos.ca.gov/notary/contact/email-notary-public-and-apostille

Amanda miller

03 Jan 2021

I've had some charges in Oklahoma. I've already received my notary commission so does that mean I can be a loan signing agent?

National Notary Association

06 Jan 2021

Hello. Many lenders and title companies that work with Signing Agents require NSAs to undergo certification and pass a background screening If you are unable to pass the background screening, you will not qualify to perform loan signing assignments for those companies.. For more information, please see here: https://www.nationalnotary.org/support/signing-agents/screening-process

SKCLark12

03 Jan 2021

What if you have a sex crime which involved being on the registry, but has been expunged and you are not on the registry anymore? Can you become a notary?

National Notary Association

04 Jan 2021

Hello. To help us answer your question, can you tell us what state you wish to apply for a commission in, please?

Skclark12

05 Jan 2021

What if you have a sex crime which involved being on the registry, but has been expunged and you are not on the registry anymore? Can you become a notary in Kansas?

National Notary Association

06 Jan 2021

Hello. According to the Kansas Notary Public Handbook, the Secretary of State may refuse to appoint persons who have been convicted of a felony or a lesser offense involving moral turpitude or of a nature that would be incompatible with the duties of a Notary, or have had a professional license revoked. We would recommend contacting the Secretary of State's office directly at kssos@ks.gov or 1-785-296-4564 to answer any questions you have about personal circumstances that may affect your eligibility for a commission.

eVA

11 Jan 2021

I reside in southern california and want to become a notary public, however im hesitant because of a misdermeanor (possesion of illegal substance) given in feb, 2019. WILL THIS BE A PROBLEM or should I try anyways?

National Notary Association

13 Jan 2021

Hello. According to the CA Secretary of State's website (https://www.sos.ca.gov/notary/qualifications), state law requires all applicants be fingerprinted as part of a background check prior to being granted an appointment as a notary public. All applicants are required to disclose on their application any arrests for which trial is pending and all convictions. The Secretary of State will recommend denial of an application for the following reasons: Failure to disclose any arrest or conviction; Conviction of a felony where not less than 10 years have passed since the completion of probation; Conviction of a disqualifying misdemeanor where not less than 5 years have passed since the completion of probation; or a determination that the facts of a particular case warrant denial, such as the nature and severity of the act or the presence of aggravating factors.

SWiggs

13 Jan 2021

Hello, what about NYS. Can you be a notary if you have a record that is over 10 years old, that was also sealed? do you have to disclose that on the application. and can you still be denied becoming a notary?

National Notary Association

13 Jan 2021

Hello. An applicant for a commission as a New York Notary Public must not have been convicted of a crime, unless the Secretary of State makes a finding in conformance with all applicable statutory requirements, including those contained in Correction Law Article 23-A, that such convictions do not constitute a bar to appointment.“Generally, a person convicted of felony cannot be appointed as a notary public. Also, certain misdemeanors are considered disqualifying. However, should a person convicted of any crime obtain an executive pardon, a certificate of relief from disabilities, or a certificate of good conduct from the parole board, he or she may be considered for appointment” (NY Department of State website, “Frequently Asked Questions”).

Alisa

14 Jan 2021

If I had adjudication withheld for petty theft 5 years ago will that stop me from being a notary? I know in Florida I’m fine but if I was to move to say Texas or Georgia would I be denied.

National Notary Association

15 Jan 2021

Hello. Regarding Texas: “A person is not eligible to be a notary public if the person was convicted of a crime involving moral turpitude or a felony and the conviction has become final, has not been set aside, and no pardon or certificate of restoration of citizenship rights has been granted” (1 TAC 87.10[b]). “A crime involving moral turpitude includes the commission of a crime involving dishonesty, fraud, deceit, misrepresentation, deliberate violence, moral depravity, or that reflects adversely on the applicant’s honesty, trustworthiness, or fitness as a notary public, which may include, but not be limited to: (1) Class A and B type misdemeanors which have not been set aside, or for which no pardon or certificate of restoration of citizenship rights have been granted; and (2) felony convictions which have not been set aside, or for which no pardon or certificate of restoration of citizenship rights have been granted” (1 TAC 87.10[c]). “Class C type misdemeanor convictions shall not be considered in determining eligibility” (1 TAC 87.10[d]). Regarding Georgia: A Georgia Notary commission may be denied by the clerk of the superior court due to: (a) the applicant’s criminal history; (b) revocation, suspension or restriction of any Notary commission or professional license in any state; (c) commission of any of the prohibited acts listed in OCGA 45-17-15(a); or (d) a finding by the Georgia Bar or any court that the applicant engaged in the unauthorized practice of law (GNH).

Tamara

16 Jan 2021

Ive was charge with DV about 2 years in nevada, i also was charge with a drug possession but it was drop, i was wondering i could qualify for nevada notary??

National Notary Association

21 Jan 2021

Hello. An applicant for appointment as a Nevada Notary Public must (NRS 240.015[1] and [3]): (a) Be at least 18 years old, (b) Be a resident of Nevada or be a resident of a bordering state and maintain or be employed at a licensed place of business in Nevada, (c) Possess his or her civil rights, and (d) Have completed a course of study pursuant to NRS 240.018.The Nevada Secretary of State has authority to require each applicant to submit a complete set of fingerprints and written permission to forward the prints to the Central Repository for Nevada Records of Criminal History for submission to the FBI for analysis; if prints are required, the applicant must pay for the processing costs (NRS 240.030[1][f]; NAC 240.215).

Scott

16 Jan 2021

Will a DUI, state of NY, 33 years ago hold me back from getting a notary in Ohio?

National Notary Association

21 Jan 2021

Hello. Ohio Notary applicants must submit a criminal records check report demonstrating that the applicant has not been convicted of or pleaded guilty or no contest to a disqualifying offense, or any offense under an existing or former law of Ohio, any other state, or the United States that is substantially equivalent to such a disqualifying offense within 6 months prior to application (ORC 147.01[B]).

Kathleen

20 Jan 2021

I am on probation for pleading guilty to driving without a license in Missouri. Will this prohibit me from obtaining a notary bond? Where can I find the specifics on line regarding this issue. Would hate to spend mo ey in training, etc, only to be denied when I apply ti be bonded. Thank you.

National Notary Association

21 Jan 2021

Hello. The Secretary of State may deny an application based on submission of an application containing a material misstatement or omission of fact, an applicant’s final adjudication and conviction or plea of guilty or nolo contendere in a criminal prosecution under any states’ laws or of the U.S., a felony conviction or plea of any offense involving dishonesty or moral turpitude issued within the past five years, a finding or admission of liability in a civil lawsuit based on the applicant’s deceit, revocation, suspension, restriction, or denial of a Notary commission or professional license by Missouri or any other state or nation within five years after such action, or an official finding that the applicant has previously engaged in official misconduct, regardless of whether disciplinary action resulted (RSMo 486.605.4).

chris burmah

23 Jan 2021

i have a dui in california and was wondering if its possible to become a notary

National Notary Association

26 Jan 2021

Hello. Please see this page for a list of possible disqualifications for a CA Notary commission: https://www.sos.ca.gov/notary/qualifications

Michelle

01 Feb 2021

Hi how about Ct, old felonies from 11 years ago, how far back does the secretary of the state check here?

National Notary Association

02 Feb 2021

Hello. The CT Secretary of the State may deny appointment to any person who has been convicted of a felony or other crime involving dishonesty or moral turpitude, who has had a previous Notary commission or professional license revoked, suspended or restricted in Connecticut or another state, or who has engaged in some form of notarial misconduct.

Laura

05 Feb 2021

I have an open misdemeanor bench warrant for urinating in public from 2008 (13 years) in California. Would I be able to be a notary in WI?

National Notary Association

05 Feb 2021

An applicant for a commission as a Wisconsin Notary Public must (WS 140.02[1]): (a) be at least 18 years old, (b) have at least the equivalent of an eighth-grade education, (c) be a United States resident (i.e., maintain a permanent dwelling place in the United States and be in fact living in this country [NPI]), (d) have knowledge and/or training with regard to the duties and responsibilities of a Wisconsin Notary, and (e) not have an unacceptable arrest or conviction record (i.e., not have been convicted in state or federal court of a felony or a misdemeanor involving a violation of the public trust, unless a pardon has been issued). “(1) For purposes of applying [WS] s. 140.02(1)(b), Stats., “an arrest or conviction record” relevant to service as a notary public is a record that includes one or more felonies or other offenses that would be admissible for purposes of impeaching the applicant’s character for truthfulness in a judicial proceeding governed by the rules of evidence of this state or the federal courts. “(2) Offenses that have been expunged or pardoned are not considered to be part of a person’s arrest or conviction record for purposes of applying s. 140.02(1)(b). “(3) A notary public or applicant must comply with any requests of the department to provide official records, reports, or other information regarding any arrests or convictions” (WAC DFI-CCS 25.03).

Crisene

14 Feb 2021

If have an arrest for a state jail felony in 2000 in the State of Texas, but no conviction. I received deferred ajudication. Does this disqualify me to notary in the state of texas?

National Notary Association

05 Mar 2021

Hello. “A person is not eligible to be a notary public if the person was convicted of a crime involving moral turpitude or a felony and the conviction has become final, has not been set aside, and no pardon or certificate of restoration of citizenship rights has been granted” (1 TAC 87.10[b]). “A crime involving moral turpitude includes the commission of a crime involving dishonesty, fraud, deceit, misrepresentation, deliberate violence, moral depravity, or that reflects adversely on the applicant’s honesty, trustworthiness, or fitness as a notary public, which may include, but not be limited to: (1) Class A and B type misdemeanors which have not been set aside, or for which no pardon or certificate of restoration of citizenship rights have been granted; and (2) felony convictions which have not been set aside, or for which no pardon or certificate of restoration of citizenship rights have been granted” (1 TAC 87.10[c]). “Class C type misdemeanor convictions shall not be considered in determining eligibility” (1 TAC 87.10[d]). If you have additional questions about specific details of your individual legal status, we recommend contacting the Texas Secretary of State's office at 1-512-463-5705.

April

15 Feb 2021

I was convicted of writing a bad check 20 years ago, can I apply to be a notary in Georgia?

National Notary Association

05 Mar 2021

Hello. A Georgia Notary commission may be denied by the clerk of the superior court due to: (a) the applicant’s criminal history; (b) revocation, suspension or restriction of any Notary commission or professional license in any state; (c) commission of any of the prohibited acts listed in OCGA 45-17-15(a); or (d) a finding by the Georgia Bar or any court that the applicant engaged in the unauthorized practice of law. If you have questions about your specific legal situation, we would recommend contacting the Georgia Superior Court Clerks’ Cooperative Authority directly at 1-404-327-6023.

Janel J

19 Feb 2021

Can your notary commission be revoked if you have an Order of Protection filed against you in the state of Maryland? Thank you for your time.

National Notary Association

24 Feb 2021

Hello. We would recommend contacting the Maryland Secretary of State's office directly at 1-410-974-5521 and ask if you can speak to someone to discuss your Notary commission status.

T.J.

25 Feb 2021

Felons aren’t born felons, they were considered law abiding citizens until a certain point in their life. People who learned their lessons and over came what was going on in their lives during that time might be more trust worthy then some non-felons. To be successful in Society you must be financially stable. In the last 15 years I have been a law abiding citizen, not even a speeding ticket. Holding people like myself back from obtaining a professional License or a certification is hurting not only us but the people in society we could help.

Onya davie

01 Mar 2021

I was arrested 16 yes ago for neglect (son got out the house while I was sleeping) charges were dismissed, didn’t have to go to court, but on my record. State of Indiana can I become a General Notary and NSA?

National Notary Association

05 Mar 2021

Hello. IC 33-42-13 lists the following as disqualifications for a Notary commission: (1) Any failure to comply with the requirements of this article or rules adopted under this article. (2) Any deceitful, dishonest, or fraudulent statement or omission made during the application for a commission. (3) Any conviction for a felony offense or a crime involving deceit, dishonesty, or fraud. (4) An adverse ruling or admission of liability in any legal proceeding pertaining to deceit, dishonesty, or fraud. (5) Any failure to discharge any duty required of a notary public. (6) Any use of false or misleading advertisements. (7) Use of any false or misleading statement claiming a right or privilege that the notary public does not have. (8) Any denial, refusal to renew, revocation, suspension, or conditioning of a notary public commission in another state. (9) Any violation of a rule or requirement that: (A) pertains to a notary public;  and (B) is required by the secretary of state. (10) Any failure to maintain an assurance as described in IC 33-42-12. If the secretary of state denies, refuses to renew, revokes, suspends, or imposes a condition on an applicant or notary public's commission, the affected party is entitled to timely notice and a hearing as described in IC 4-21.5.

Ayesha

07 Mar 2021

I have a class b misdemeanor theft from over 11 years ago. Will it disqualify me from becoming a notary in Texas?

National Notary Association

09 Mar 2021

Hello. In Texas, “A person is not eligible to be a notary public if the person was convicted of a crime involving moral turpitude or a felony and the conviction has become final, has not been set aside, and no pardon or certificate of restoration of citizenship rights has been granted” (1 TAC 87.10[b]). “A crime involving moral turpitude includes the commission of a crime involving dishonesty, fraud, deceit, misrepresentation, deliberate violence, moral depravity, or that reflects adversely on the applicant’s honesty, trustworthiness, or fitness as a notary public, which may include, but not be limited to: (1) Class A and B type misdemeanors which have not been set aside, or for which no pardon or certificate of restoration of citizenship rights have been granted; and (2) felony convictions which have not been set aside, or for which no pardon or certificate of restoration of citizenship rights have been granted” (1 TAC 87.10[c]).

Gayle norris

10 Mar 2021

What about Tennessee. I read the law but it’s kind of vague

National Notary Association

11 Mar 2021

No one may serve as a Notary who: (a) has been convicted of bribery, larceny or certain other offenses unless restored to citizenship (TCA 8-18-101). If you have questions about a specific legal issue in your record, we recommend that you contact the state directly at 1-615-741-2650 so you can discuss your situation privately with them.

DD

12 Mar 2021

I received a misdemeanor traffic ticket 25 years ago would.that stop me from becoming a notary?

National Notary Association

15 Mar 2021

Hello. To help us answer your question, can you please tell us what state you are located in?

Debra Jones

12 Mar 2021

I was convicted 25 yrs ago for a misdemeanor speeding ticket, can that stop me.from becoming a notary?

National Notary Association

15 Mar 2021

Hello. To help us answer your question, can you please tell us what state you are located in?

DEBRA D JONES

15 Mar 2021

I AM IN CALIFORNIA

National Notary Association

16 Mar 2021

Hello. Each California Notary application is evaluated individually. When considering whether to deny a commission application, the Secretary of State's office considers a number of different factors, including the nature and severity of the act, mitigating and/or aggravating circumstances, and other factors. For more information about the types of offenses that can result in denial and potential factors that can affect rejection or denial, please see here: https://notary.cdn.sos.ca.gov/forms/notary-guidelines-2012.pdf. If a Notary application is denied, the Secretary of State must specify the reasons for the denial and the applicant may appeal the denial by requesting an administrative hearing.

Matt

19 Mar 2021

Hi, I already have my commission as a notary in Virginia. I was accused of a misdemeanor assault on a family member that was dismissed because I proved that I didn't commit the crime, but I pled guilty to violating the protective order because the judge would not accept my evidence. With both of these, I was still commissioned, but can I still pass my background check even with the dismissed charge?

National Notary Association

23 Mar 2021

Hello. In order to be eligible for a VA commission, applicants must never have been convicted of a felony under the laws of the United States, Virginia or any other state unless pardoned, had rights restored or had the conviction vacated (COV 47.1-4). If you have a legal situation that you believe may affect your commission eligibility, we recommend that you directly contact the state Notary Public Commission at 1-804-692-2536 or at notary@governor.virginia.gov to discuss the situation directly with them privately.

Amber

25 Mar 2021

In Ohio I got Persisitant Dissorderly Conduct, can I still get it.

National Notary Association

31 Mar 2021

Hello. Please see this page for a list of disqualifying offenses in Ohio: https://www.ohiosos.gov/notary/criminal-records-check/

Aisha K Simmons

06 Apr 2021

Will deposit check fraud- bounce checks and my personal account and suspended license disqualify me from becoming a notary public in ga

National Notary Association

08 Apr 2021

Hello. According to the Georgia Notary Handbook, an applicant may be denied by the clerk of the superior court due to: (a) the applicant’s criminal history; (b) revocation, suspension or restriction of any Notary commission or professional license in any state; (c) commission of any of the prohibited acts listed in OCGA 45-17-15(a); or (d) a finding by the Georgia Bar or any court that the applicant engaged in the unauthorized practice of law.

Aisha K Simmons

06 Apr 2021

What are the disqualifying charges in Ga. For misdemeanor charges

National Notary Association

08 Apr 2021

Hello. According to the Georgia Notary Handbook, an applicant may be denied by the clerk of the superior court due to: (a) the applicant’s criminal history; (b) revocation, suspension or restriction of any Notary commission or professional license in any state; (c) commission of any of the prohibited acts listed in OCGA 45-17-15(a); or (d) a finding by the Georgia Bar or any court that the applicant engaged in the unauthorized practice of law.

Gwes

11 Apr 2021

Can I become a notary and signing agent in illinois with a felony in Georgia (28 years ago)?

National Notary Association

12 Apr 2021

Hello. A Georgia Notary commission may be denied by the clerk of the superior court due to: (a) the applicant’s criminal history; (b) revocation, suspension or restriction of any Notary commission or professional license in any state; (c) commission of any of the prohibited acts listed in OCGA 45-17-15(a); or (d) a finding by the Georgia Bar or any court that the applicant engaged in the unauthorized practice of law (GNH). A Signing Agent background screening that follows the standards recommended by the Signing Professionals Workgroup will disqualify a Signing Agent who accumulates 25 points worth of disqualifications due to offenses on their record. For a list of disqualifying offenses, please see here: https://spswg.files.wordpress.com/2021/03/spw-bgs-standards-03-21.pdf

GW

12 Apr 2021

I live in Illinois but I have a 25yr old felony in Georgia. Unlawful credit card use. Long story...Can I become a notary and signing agent in Illinois despite having the getting registered in Georgia?

National Notary Association

13 Apr 2021

Hello. No, an applicant for an Illinois Notary commission is disqualified if the applicant has been convicted of a felony (5 ILCS 312/2-102 [i]).

Marie

26 Apr 2021

I'm looking to get my notary public license for work in NY. When I was a teen I was convicted of fraud. But was granted youthful offender status. And also a criminal mischief charge that was dismissed. Am I able to check 'no' under the criminal conviction question, because I'm a YO and the record is sealed?

National Notary Association

26 Apr 2021

Hello. In New York, a Notary applicant must not have been convicted of a crime, unless the Secretary of State makes a finding in conformance with all applicable statutory requirements, including those contained in Correction Law Article 23-A, that such convictions do not constitute a bar to appointment. We would suggest that you may wish to contact the Department of State directly at 1-518-474-4429 to ask if your circumstances would constitute a bar to appointment or not.

Erin

28 Apr 2021

I havea dui in VA , and was wondering how do I figure out if I can become a notary Thank you

National Notary Association

29 Apr 2021

Hello. In order to be eligible for a Virginia commission, an applicant must never have been convicted of a felony under the laws of the United States, Virginia or any other state unless pardoned, had rights restored or had the conviction vacated (COV 47.1-4).

Curt

17 May 2021

Even if you lose your commission for a heinous crime and can no longer notarize, you can still go on to be a politician.

DP

18 May 2021

I pled to a felony charge in Colorado over 22 years ago and completed 5 years probation. I recently renewed my notary commission in CO. I currently reside in the state of NC and would like to apply for their notary commission. Would my past plea disqualify me from being commissioned as a notary in NC?

National Notary Association

24 May 2021

The Secretary of State may deny an application for commission or recommission based on “(t)he applicant’s conviction or plea of admission or nolo contendere to a felony or any crime involving dishonesty or moral turpitude. In no case may a commission be issued to an applicant within 10 years after release from prison, probation, or parole, whichever is later” (GS 10B-5[d][2]). “A notary public may not hold public office if he or she: • Has been convicted of a felony under North Carolina or federal law. • Has been convicted of a felony in another state that is also considered a felony under North Carolina law. • Has been convicted of corruption or malpractice in any office. • Has been removed from any office by impeachment. “All of these constitutional disqualifications prevent anyone from holding the office of notary public if his or her citizenship rights have not been restored in the manner prescribed by law. However, individuals who have been incarcerated or placed on probation are able to submit an application for consideration provided that 10 years have passed since the applicant’s last day of prison, parole, or probation. G.S. 10B-5(d)(2)”

Sarah

19 May 2021

In California, can someone with an infraction (just paid a fine only, no arrest and no court) involving moral turpitude become a notary?

National Notary Association

20 May 2021

Hello. Please see this page for more information: https://www.sos.ca.gov/notary/qualifications

Ashley

21 May 2021

Hi in 2008 I was arrested for a felony in Texas. Months later in June 2009 I had court and was sentenced to house arrest. Being it was my first time in trouble, the judge lowered my felony to a class b misdemeanor (which my certified copy of my background check reflects). 6 months later I successfully completed my house arrest fingers were paid and I had no other obligations to complete. Would this keep me from having my application approved in Texas.

National Notary Association

26 May 2021

“A person is not eligible to be a notary public if the person was convicted of a crime involving moral turpitude or a felony and the conviction has become final, has not been set aside, and no pardon or certificate of restoration of citizenship rights has been granted” (1 TAC 87.10[b]). “A crime involving moral turpitude includes the commission of a crime involving dishonesty, fraud, deceit, misrepresentation, deliberate violence, moral depravity, or that reflects adversely on the applicant’s honesty, trustworthiness, or fitness as a notary public, which may include, but not be limited to: (1) Class A and B type misdemeanors which have not been set aside, or for which no pardon or certificate of restoration of citizenship rights have been granted; and (2) felony convictions which have not been set aside, or for which no pardon or certificate of restoration of citizenship rights have been granted” (1 TAC 87.10[c]). “Class C type misdemeanor convictions shall not be considered in determining eligibility” (1 TAC 87.10[d]).

Fard M.

21 May 2021

I live in pa. I want to get a commission. Where can i find the disqualifying factors.

National Notary Association

24 May 2021

Hello. 57 Pa.C.S. 323 states that a commission may be denied, refused for renewal, revoked, suspended, or a condition imposed on a commission for an act or omission which demonstrates that the individual lacks the honesty, integrity, competence or reliability to act as a notary public.  Such acts or omissions include: (1) Failure to comply with 57 Pa.C.S. 323. (2) A fraudulent, dishonest or deceitful misstatement or omission in the application for a commission as a notary public submitted to the department. (3) Conviction of or acceptance of Accelerated Rehabilitative Disposition by the applicant or notary public for a felony or an offense involving fraud, dishonesty or deceit. (4) A finding against or admission of liability by the applicant or notary public in a legal proceeding or disciplinary action based on the fraud, dishonesty or deceit of the applicant or notary public. (5) Failure by a notary public to discharge a duty required of a notary public, whether by this chapter, by regulation of the department or by Federal or State law. (6) Use of false or misleading advertising or representation by a notary public representing that the notary public has a duty, right or privilege that the notary public does not have. (7) Violation by a notary public of a regulation of the department regarding a notary public. (8) Denial, refusal to renew, revocation, suspension or conditioning of a notary public commission in another state. (9) Failure of a notary public to maintain a bond under section 321(d) (relating to appointment and commission as notary public;  qualifications;  no immunity or benefit).

Monica kimchi

27 May 2021

Oklahoma. Pending embezzlement case. More than likely will become misdemeanor

National Notary Association

27 May 2021

An applicant for an Oklahoma Notary Public commission must (49 OS 1 and 49 OS 1.1; OAC 655:25-1-2[a][4] and [a][5]): (a) Be a citizen of the United States (49 OS 1); (b) Be a legal resident of Oklahoma or an out-of-state resident who is employed in Oklahoma; (c) Be 18 years of age or older; (d) Be able to read and write English; and (e) Never have been convicted of a felony.

Tyrah

01 Jun 2021

Hello, I live in Pennsylvania I was in court 2019 for a simple assault that has been thrown out, but due to Covid it’s still appears as active. Will I be able to still become a signing agent with this case still saying that it’s active? I have the proof of the court stamped paper that was given to me when the case was thrown out.

National Notary Association

02 Jun 2021

Hello. You may wish to contact the PA Department of State directly at 1-717-787-5280 or ST-NOTARIES@pa.gov to discuss the details of your situation with them.

Matthew N Brooks

04 Jun 2021

If I have simple possession charges in Virginia the youngest of which is 4 years old, can I get approved for the background check?

National Notary Association

07 Jun 2021

Hello. To qualify for a VA commission, an applicant must never have been convicted of a felony under the laws of the United States, Virginia or any other state unless pardoned, had rights restored or had the conviction vacated.(COV 47.1-4). If you have concerns about a specific situation in your past that might affect your eligibility, please contact the Virginia Secretary of the Commonwealth's office at 1-804-692-2536 and ask to discuss it with a member of the Notary Public Division.

Rebecca Hutson

11 Jun 2021

I’m wondering if I would get approved to become a notary, I have a Theft misdemeanor A, and it’s from 4 years ago. I’m about halfway done with my expunction, so I could wait until that’s finalized, or can I apply before then?

National Notary Association

15 Jun 2021

Hello. To help us answer your question, what state do you wish to apply for a Notary commission in?

Aretha Marie Johnson

12 Jun 2021

Would this be for a charge as well? Like what if you were charged with the offense but not actually convicted and the disposition of the offense was a dismissal? Would I be eligible to apply for a notary commission in NC?

National Notary Association

17 Jun 2021

Hello. The Secretary of State may deny an application for commission or recommission based on “(t)he applicant’s conviction or plea of admission or nolo contendere to a felony or any crime involving dishonesty or moral turpitude. In no case may a commission be issued to an applicant within 10 years after release from prison, probation, or parole, whichever is later” (GS 10B-5[d][2]). “A notary public may not hold public office if he or she: • Has been convicted of a felony under North Carolina or federal law. • Has been convicted of a felony in another state that is also considered a felony under North Carolina law. • Has been convicted of corruption or malpractice in any office. • Has been removed from any office by impeachment. “All of these constitutional disqualifications prevent anyone from holding the office of notary public if his or her citizenship rights have not been restored in the manner prescribed by law. However, individuals who have been incarcerated or placed on probation are able to submit an application for consideration provided that 10 years have passed since the applicant’s last day of prison, parole, or probation. G.S. 10B-5(d)(2)” (NPG). If you have a situation where you are unsure if it would affect eligibility for a commission or not, we recommend that you contact the North Carolina Secretary of State's office at 1-919-807-2219 and ask to speak to them about the matter.

Jane

25 Jun 2021

Hi, I have a misdemeanor Pedi theft for shoplifting in CA. This was about 8 years ago and I recently expunged my record. Would I qualify?

National Notary Association

01 Jul 2021

Hello. In California, Applicants must pass a background check by both the FBI and the California Department of Justice, including submission of fingerprints (GC 8201.1[a] through [d]). “Applicants found to be non-compliant with child or family support orders will be issued temporary term notary public commissions. Notaries public found to be non-compliant after the commission is issued may be subject to commission suspension or revocation” (website, “Qualifications”; see also Family Code 17520). If you have questions about a specific legal situation, please contact the Secretary of State's Notary Public Section directly at 1-916-653-3595 to ask if you can speak to someone about your application eligibility.

Selie

26 Jun 2021

Hi, in the state of Texas- would someone be disqualified if they are currently awaiting trial for a class a misdemeanor for family violence, or domestic violence? Also, say the charges get dropped, would it still affect person from becoming a notary?

National Notary Association

01 Jul 2021

Hello. Offenses that can disqualify a commission applicant in Texas are listed below. If you have questions about your specific situation, please contact the TX Secretary of State's office at 1-512-463-5705 and ask if you can speak to someone in the Notary Public Unit directly. “A person is not eligible to be a notary public if the person was convicted of a crime involving moral turpitude or a felony and the conviction has become final, has not been set aside, and no pardon or certificate of restoration of citizenship rights has been granted” (1 TAC 87.10[b]). “A crime involving moral turpitude includes the commission of a crime involving dishonesty, fraud, deceit, misrepresentation, deliberate violence, moral depravity, or that reflects adversely on the applicant’s honesty, trustworthiness, or fitness as a notary public, which may include, but not be limited to: (1) Class A and B type misdemeanors which have not been set aside, or for which no pardon or certificate of restoration of citizenship rights have been granted; and (2) felony convictions which have not been set aside, or for which no pardon or certificate of restoration of citizenship rights have been granted” (1 TAC 87.10[c]). “Class C type misdemeanor convictions shall not be considered in determining eligibility” (1 TAC 87.10[d]).

Gcruz791@gmail.com

30 Jun 2021

If someone had domestic violence that was dismissed does it still disqualify you from becoming a notary?

National Notary Association

01 Jul 2021

Hello. To help us answer your question, can you please tell us what state the person wishes to apply for a Notary commission in?

Lisa

19 Jul 2021

I am in Utah getting ready to start my test and background check to become a notary. Yesterday I had a ticket for marijuana possession for a small amount. Can I still be a notary? If I complete the background check before the court decision in a few weeks will that work?

National Notary Association

23 Jul 2021

Hello. We recommend that you contact the Notary office at the Lt. Governor's office (1-801-538-1041) and ask if a Notary official is available to answer your questions.

Bryant Able

21 Jul 2021

I was arrested for embezzelment ( stole from my job)in 2002 when I was 18. I went through deferred adjucation and probation. I was therefore not convicted but the arrest is still on my record. Can I become a notary?

National Notary Association

21 Jul 2021

Hello. In order to help us answer your question, can you please tell us what state you wish to apply for a Notary commission in?

Joshua Galloway

22 Jul 2021

I have a class A misdemeanor theft charge from Texas. I currently live in Georgia can I be a Notary…?

National Notary Association

23 Jul 2021

A Georgia Notary commission may be denied by the clerk of the superior court due to: (a) the applicant’s criminal history; (b) revocation, suspension or restriction of any Notary commission or professional license in any state; (c) commission of any of the prohibited acts listed in OCGA 45-17-15(a); or (d) a finding by the Georgia Bar or any court that the applicant engaged in the unauthorized practice of law (GNH). We suggest that you contact the Georgia Superior Court Clerks’ Cooperative Authority at 1-404-327-6023 to see if you can speak with a Notary official to discuss your situation in more detail.

DC.

08 Aug 2021

Hi. I was convicted of misdemeanor domestic violence back in 2007, disposed 2009, in GA. I paid all restitution, fees, met all conditions, etc. Since then, no trouble whatsoever, productive citizen, hard working man..now residing in NC. Because of this soon to be 12 he old misdemeanor charge, am I disqualified in the state of NC? Thanks

National Notary Association

12 Aug 2021

The Secretary of State may deny an application for commission or recommission based on “(t)he applicant’s conviction or plea of admission or nolo contendere to a felony or any crime involving dishonesty or moral turpitude. In no case may a commission be issued to an applicant within 10 years after release from prison, probation, or parole, whichever is later” (GS 10B-5[d][2]). “A notary public may not hold public office if he or she: • Has been convicted of a felony under North Carolina or federal law. • Has been convicted of a felony in another state that is also considered a felony under North Carolina law. • Has been convicted of corruption or malpractice in any office. • Has been removed from any office by impeachment. “All of these constitutional disqualifications prevent anyone from holding the office of notary public if his or her citizenship rights have not been restored in the manner prescribed by law. However, individuals who have been incarcerated or placed on probation are able to submit an application for consideration provided that 10 years have passed since the applicant’s last day of prison, parole, or probation. G.S. 10B-5(d)(2)” (Notary Public Guidebook for North Carolina)

Rich Livengood

18 Aug 2021

Hi. Ann Arundel County. MD.. I have one CDS 25 years ago. I have other CDS in other state as recently as 2015…. Should I try.? Do the references help at all? Thank you so much

National Notary Association

26 Aug 2021

Hello. Maryland Notaries are required to undergo a background check. We recommend you contact the state Notary division directly at 1-410-974-5521 to privately discuss whether your personal situation will affect your eligibility.

Traci Sandford

03 Sep 2021

I was convicted of a gross misdemeanor charge for attempt grand larceny in Nevada 10 years ago. I completed probation and was given an honorable discharge. It was, unfortunately, a wrong place, wrong time, guilty by association type of situation for me. I have not had any problems or encounters with the law since. Would that be something that would disqualify me from becoming a public notary in Nevada?

National Notary Association

10 Sep 2021

Hello. To qualify for a Notary commission in Nevada, an applicant must possess his or her civil rights (NRS 240.015[1]) and undergo a background check (NRS 240.030[1][f]; NAC 240.215). If you have concerns about a situation on your record, we recommend contacting the Nevada Secretary of State's office directly at 1-775-684-5708 and ask to speak to someone from the Notary Division who can answer questions about your specific status.

Mandi smith

03 Sep 2021

I live in Washington and was wondering what the laws are here?

National Notary Association

07 Sep 2021

Hello. You can find information on Washington state Notary laws here: https://www.nationalnotary.org/file%20library/nna/reference-library/state-law-summaries/washington.pdf

Sara C

09 Sep 2021

Hello, I haven't really been able to find a clear answer for my question. Well over 5 years ago, I was charged for theft for a $5 tshirt, I took a class and got it expunged off my record. When I get a federal fingerprint background check, it shows I have "a record" because I was fingerprinted. But on a state level background check, nothing shows up. Does this disqualify me in PA? I would hate to move on and continue spending money to be disqualified. I cant find much info on expunged charges.

National Notary Association

10 Sep 2021

Hello. We would suggest contacting the PA Department of State directly at 1-717-787-5280 and ask to speak to a Notary official there about your eligibility status.

Kevin Galland

15 Sep 2021

Hey I was wondering about Louisiana. It says no felonies unless pardoned on your site, but the SOS site says no felonies and no pardons. It was for possession.

National Notary Association

17 Sep 2021

Hello. We recommend you contact the state Notary Division directly at 1-225-922-0507 and ask if you can speak to a member of their staff about your situation privately.

curious

20 Sep 2021

Under the first time offender act can you be a Notary?

curious

20 Sep 2021

I forgot to say that I'm in Georgia

National Notary Association

20 Sep 2021

Hello. According to the Georgia Notary Handbook, a Georgia Notary commission may be denied by the clerk of the superior court due to: (a) the applicant’s criminal history; (b) revocation, suspension or restriction of any Notary commission or professional license in any state; (c) commission of any of the prohibited acts listed in OCGA 45-17-15(a); or (d) a finding by the Georgia Bar or any court that the applicant engaged in the unauthorized practice of law (GNH). If you have a situation and aren't sure if it affects your commission eligibility, we recommend contacting the Georgia Superior Court Clerks’ Cooperative Authority Notary Division at 1-404-327-6023 and ask to speak to someone about your eligibility.

James Tommy

21 Sep 2021

hello, Over 10 years ago, while in college, I was convicted of misdemeanor forgery and giving out false information (providing a false information to a police officer). Later I was arrested for obstruction of justice and identity fraud but was never convicted ( my college roommate and I stopped paying for a Rent-A-Center and when used fake names...which is horrible.) I was never been arrested again and currently have a government management job. I want to apply to be a Notary in New York. What are my chances?

National Notary Association

23 Sep 2021

Hello. To qualify for a New York Notary commission, an applicant must not have been convicted of a crime, unless the Secretary of State makes a finding in conformance with all applicable statutory requirements, including those contained in Correction Law Article 23-A, that such convictions do not constitute a bar to appointment. You may wish to contact the Department of State's Division of Licensing Services directly at 1-518-474-4429 if you have additional questions about your situation and how it affects your NY commission eligibility.

Esther M.

01 Oct 2021

I currently live in Arizona and I am a legal Permanent Resident for almost 30 years, will I be able to become a notary. I read in several requirements that you have to be a US citizen. Is this true?

National Notary Association

06 Oct 2021

Hello. Permanent residents are eligible to hold an Arizona Notary commission provided they meet all other eligibility requirements. An applicant for a commission as an Arizona Notary Public must (ARS 41-312.E and 41-330.A.2; RM): (a) be at least eighteen years of age, (b) be a citizen or a legal permanent resident of the United States, (c) either be a resident of Arizona state for income tax purposes and claim his or her Arizona residence as the primary residence on state and federal tax returns, or be registered to vote in Arizona, (d) never have been convicted of a felony unless civil rights have been restored but not if it was a conviction for a lesser offense involving moral turpitude or of a nature that is incompatible with the duties of a Notary, and (e) be able to read and write English.

Tanesha Wilkes

05 Oct 2021

I live in GA. I received a dui in 2014 on my bday I'm not a drinker. I wanted to know will I fail the background check since it hasn't been 10 years? And will I get a refund if I were to fail it?

National Notary Association

07 Oct 2021

Hello. We forwarded your query to our Customer Care team, and someone will be in touch with you shortly to assist you.

Cbern

09 Oct 2021

I have a felony from California, I was 16 at the time. I am 39 now never an issue or problem since. I was a minor, now in NC and trying to become a notary. Would that felony charge as a minor count against me to become a notary?

National Notary Association

12 Oct 2021

Hello. North Carolina's Notary Public Guide states the following: “A notary public may not hold public office if he or she: • Has been convicted of a felony under North Carolina or federal law. • Has been convicted of a felony in another state that is also considered a felony under North Carolina law. • Has been convicted of corruption or malpractice in any office. • Has been removed from any office by impeachment. “All of these constitutional disqualifications prevent anyone from holding the office of notary public if his or her citizenship rights have not been restored in the manner prescribed by law. However, individuals who have been incarcerated or placed on probation are able to submit an application for consideration provided that 10 years have passed since the applicant’s last day of prison, parole, or probation. G.S. 10B-5(d)(2)” (NPG).

Peter

10 Oct 2021

I am in Illinois and have a misdemeanor shoplifting charge from 20 years ago. Can I become a notary signing agent?

National Notary Association

12 Oct 2021

Hello. To qualify for a Notary commission in Illinois, an applicant must meet the following requirements: An applicant for appointment as an Illinois Notary must (5 ILCS 312/2-102[d] through [i]): (a) Be a U.S. citizen or a lawful permanent resident; (b) Be an Illinois resident for at least 30 days or a resident of a qualifying bordering state who has been employed in Illinois for at least 30 days; (c) Provide his or her date of birth; (d) Be able to read and write English; (e) Have not been convicted of a felony; and (f) Have never had a Notary commission revoked or suspended in the past 10 years. Given the amount of direct access to private financial information, the mortgage industry has mandated annual background screenings for Notary Signing Agents and everyone involved during a loan signing. The background check assigns points for potential disqualifying offenses. If the NSA receives 25 points or higher, you will not be eligible to work as a Notary Signing Agent. For more information please see these links: https://www.nationalnotary.org/knowledge-center/signing-agent-resources/background-screenings and https://spswg.files.wordpress.com/2020/06/spw-bgs-standards-06-20.pdf.

Nicky

21 Oct 2021

If you live in Kansas and have misdemeanor theft, can you become a notary? Mine lapsed 06/01/2021 and they did not revoke my notary because of it, but will they let me start a new policy now that is has lapsed and that will be on there? Only requirements I can find for Kansas are being 18 or older, a citizen or visa, and work or maintain a profession in Kansas.

National Notary Association

22 Oct 2021

Hello. The Secretary of State may refuse to appoint persons who have been convicted of a felony or a lesser offense involving moral turpitude or of a nature that would be incompatible with the duties of a Notary, or have had a professional license revoked. We would recommend you contact the Notary Clerk's office at 1-785-296-4564 to ask to speak to someone regarding your situation and to ask if it will affect your commission renewal.

Bethany

02 Nov 2021

I was arrested for possession 2019 in NH, but has been dismissed. Also had a accident I had to go to court for in MA that may leave me with a misdemeanor, I am applying inASS for a notary, these disqualify me in MASS?

National Notary Association

03 Nov 2021

Hello. In Massachusetts, an application for a Notary commission or reappointment as a Notary may be denied by any of the following based on the Governor’s discretion: (1) submission of an official application containing a material misstatement or omission of fact; (2) conviction of an offense that resulted in a prison sentence; (3) conviction of a misdemeanor offense that resulted in a sentence to probation or a fine or a conviction for a violation of GL 90, Sec. 24[1][a] or paragraph (a) of subdivision (1) or GL 90B, Sec. 8[a]; (4) admission to sufficient facts to warrant a finding of guilt of any offense; (5) a finding or admission of responsibility or liability in a civil action based on the applicant’s fraud or deceit; (6) revocation, suspension, restriction or denial of a Notary commission or professional licensure by the Commonwealth or any other jurisdiction; or (7) any other reason, including official misconduct, that in the Governor’s discretion, would render the applicant unsuitable to hold a Notary commission.

desirae

03 Nov 2021

I have a misdemeanor for trespassing in Indiana will that stop me from being a notary because of the background check.

National Notary Association

04 Nov 2021

Hello. Under IC 33-42-13, the Indiana Secretary of State may deny a commission if the applicant has any conviction for a felony offense or a crime involving deceit, dishonesty, or fraud, or an adverse ruling or admission of liability in any legal proceeding pertaining to deceit, dishonesty, or fraud. If you are unsure if your legal status would affect your eligibility, you may wish to contact the Secretary of State's office directly at 317-232-6542 to discuss your concern.

Leave a Comment

Required *

All comments are reviewed and if approved, will display.

Close