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Notary Bulletin

What Would You Do: The Case of the Signer and the Unhappy Daughter

The Notary Hotline receives hundreds of calls every day from Notaries who find themselves in challenging situations. To help your knowledge of Notary standards of practice, we’ve created a series of scenarios based on actual situations and ask a simple question: What would you do?

To prevent possible fraud or misrepresentation of a signer’s wishes, Notaries are expected to rely only on direct communication with the signer. But what would you do in this tricky workplace situation?

Imagine you are a Notary working at your office. A customer arrives at your workplace accompanied by his daughter. The customer needs a financial benefits document notarized. You are assigned to perform the notarization, but when you meet the signer, you realize the signer does not speak English, and you do not speak the signer’s language.

The daughter offers to serve as an interpreter for you and the signer. “We’ve had this type of document notarized before, and the other Notaries didn’t have any problem with me interpreting for my father,” she says. When you express concerns about not being able to communicate directly with the signer, the daughter demands to speak with your manager.

What Would You Do?

Do you refuse to proceed with the notarization under threat of the customers complaining to your manager and potentially getting you in trouble with your boss? Do you complete the notarization as asked, even though you can’t communicate directly with the signer? Or is there a third option you would take instead?

To participate in this “What Would You Do?” scenario, share your response in the comments section below. We may mention your answer in next week’s Bulletin, when we discuss the best possible solution(s) to this notarial challenge.

David Thun is an Associate Editor at the National Notary Association.

 

View All: Best Practices

115 Comments

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Tamira

02 Dec 2020

Allow her to translate if she has no financial gain from the document. If she will gain financially or has an interest in the document then I would explain I need to access her father's ability to understand what's being signed and allow her to speak with my manager.

Vince Glass

03 Dec 2020

Create a consent form for the daughter and the father to sign that acknowledges the daughters acting as the communicator and is responsible for providing accurate information to the Notary.

Mike Goodey

05 Dec 2020

We cannot use a translator. We have no idea if the document gives the daughter a financial interest. Best idea would be to find a notary that can communicate with the signer in his language.

David Doiron

07 Dec 2020

I would utilize Google Translate to converse directly with the signer. That is the safest way to authorize the intent of the notarization. You could even communicate in this manner with the father to authorize the daughter to translate.

Jonathan Scott

07 Dec 2020

I would probably ask them to find a bilingual notary. We are asked to know who is the signer and how willing and how coherent of what is being notarized. If we cannot establish communication directly with the signer, then it could be fraudulent. The notary is liable not the manager.

Vanessa Kirkland

07 Dec 2020

A notary that speaks the language of the signer should be sought. If a notary doesn't speak the language and understand what's being said, you are opening the door to misbehavior. That would make the notary liable.

Bernadine Rider

07 Dec 2020

Regardless of whether she would benefit, I would use an interpreting company, because if I don't speak the language there is no way of knowing what she is actually telling her father or what he may be agreeing to. I would rather be sure, than take the chance. My duties as a notary are determined by state law, not my employer, so feel free to speak to my supervisor.

Christopher M Garcia

07 Dec 2020

In Florida, the law does not allow for the use of an interpreter. The notary must have direct communication. Regardless of what the employer said they would need to find a notary that speaks the language.

Patti R

07 Dec 2020

I would suggest to the daughter, that another employee who speaks their language, come into the room and either listen, to ensure the daughter is telling you what her father really wants, or to translate the father's wishes. Along with advising the daughter that this is for her benefit as well as the notary and the notary's employer.

Pat

07 Dec 2020

The Notary must be sure that the signer knows what he is signing - let a Manager get involved. The Notary must follow the law even if it means people get mad at them.

Ruth Crichlow

07 Dec 2020

Do not accept the case if you cannot understand the language. There should be a way to have the necessary form translated. A consent form for relatives with no financial gain should be included in our package.

Kimberly Duke

07 Dec 2020

I would first ask to see proper identification from both father and daughter. I would then explain that I need to have someone else notarize his documents that can speak to your father and that I’m unable to help.

Diane Smith

07 Dec 2020

Politely decline the Notary and refer them to a bi-lingual Notary. A Notary must never allow anyone to translate a document or offer to speak fo the signer. Creating a “consent” form is absolutely not an option. If you get in “trouble” with your boss, time to get a new job.

Alice W.

07 Dec 2020

Depending on the type of documents needed I would utilize a company such as “ALTA Professional & Accurate Language Translation ServicesA” Especially if pertains to financial matters It also depends on what language the dockyard written in. If it’s not in my language I would have to refuse and try to refer to a different notary Even if there is no financial gain for the daughter I would call the notary NNA 800 number for clearance on the daughter translating on her behalf

Tommacena Douglas

07 Dec 2020

First off I would see if there was a bilingual notary within the company I work with. If not I would call for my manager and then explain the situation to him/her. I would then try to locate them a person that spoke the signer's language and recommend they go there. I would not notarize it however, not being able to communicate with the signer or to even know what is being communicated.

ALISHA HUDSON

07 Dec 2020

Do not notarize the document. Let the daughter you need to be able to communicate with her father.

Jim Morton

07 Dec 2020

This is a tough one. I have found most people in America who cannot speak English actually can understand simple English. I would try to communicate that way but if there is no way to communicate I would recommend another Notary who can speak to the father in his native language. I would take the heat from my manager explaining why I cannot notarize.

Gayle Tate

07 Dec 2020

I would use software to translate written messages between the father and I. I have done this in other situations and while it's not ideal, languages in the USA are so diverse now, I have occasionally had to do this.

John J

07 Dec 2020

If possible, I would run a digital copy of the document through Google Translate. If the daughter objects, I would not perform the notary and let her speak to the manager. This is a lawsuit waiting to happen.

Dawn Henderson

07 Dec 2020

I would suggest that she find another notary that is able to communicate with her father. Then direct her to my manager and explain to them that I do not feel comfortable notarizing the document for the customer because I don't speak the same language as the father and want to make sure he understands fully.

Jessica Perri

07 Dec 2020

Wouldn’t this be a great way to use google translate? Type in what you want to ask him and/or acknowledge and it will translate to his language. Have him read and sign.

Delois Wilson

07 Dec 2020

Explain to her that I must be able to understand her father’s responses to notarize the document, therefore I will not be able to perform the notarization of the document. Also allow her to speak with my manager.

Tawana Bellamy

07 Dec 2020

I would not go forward with thus signing because,I would get in trouble by letting them use interpretation.They might use wrong wording different then what im explaining to them.I don't understand the language they speak.I would give them information to someone that would be able to better help them.

LaVern Bentz

07 Dec 2020

I agree with Mr. Glass (comment 3 Dec 2020), but I would go 1 step further and have both parties sign the form explaining that the form would be notarized and attached as an additional document to the document originally being signed.

Candi Rosenthal

07 Dec 2020

Depending on the length of the document and whether or not you have proper ID I might use the app on the IPhone that translates what you type in to their language along with having the father translate. She can read what you wrote in her language.

Bunleang Kors

07 Dec 2020

You can cancel this appoint at this time, and reschedule next time with the interpreter.

Marguerite Canlon

07 Dec 2020

I would not sign.

Ana Ramírez

07 Dec 2020

Can’t do it, find a notary that speaks your language.

Kenya Slayton

07 Dec 2020

If it is a place of business perhaps they have a translation service that may be utilized.

Czolgus Evans

07 Dec 2020

Check with your manager regarding a peer at the office that could communicate with the father.

Lisa Ellis

07 Dec 2020

I personally would relieve myself of the uncomfortable situation if I felt that my license could be jeopardized in anyway. I would call the title company, and let them know that I didn’t feel comfortable with that scenario.

Jose Gomez

07 Dec 2020

The problem is the daughter who insists on being the interpreter. Texas regulations emphatically states a notary must have direct communication with the individual, therefore, I would tactfully ask her to find a notary who speaks his language. If the boss has an issue with my decision, I will remind him that I am responsible first to the State and to him second.

Cynthia Key

07 Dec 2020

I would excuse myself and ask my manager. If no one I know personally is available to translate I might use Google translate. It translates live so I would know what the daughter is saying.

JT LaPerna

07 Dec 2020

The Notary Public Code of Professional Responsibility offers this professional best practice: "The Notary shall not notarize for any person with whom the Notary cannot directly communicate in the same language, regardless of the presence of a third-party interpreter or translator."

A Deloris Blair-Cannon

07 Dec 2020

I would express to my manager that there is a communication barrier between me and the signer and ask if there’s anyone in the office that speaks the language of the signer that can proceed with the signing.

Betsy Campbell

07 Dec 2020

I would refer them to go to the NNA‘s signing agent page and search for a notary in the area then filter by language. I would walk them through it.

Michael S Polusky

07 Dec 2020

I need to swear him in and that is not possible based on the language issue before I can start the process. They can tell my boss about this issue. I am legally bound by the law. I don’t know what the daughter is trying to pull, but I’m not comfortable in completing the process.

Ilona

07 Dec 2020

No, the rule is being able to communicate directly with the signer! Advise, the daughter you will assist by trying to find another notary that speaks the same language. Also, to calm and ease the situation still, allowing her to speak with the manager.

Marguerite Nicely

07 Dec 2020

If the signer and the notary do not speak the same language, I would say Sorry, I cannot sign or stamp this. According to the "The signer does not speak the same language as the Notary Signer disqualifications # 3

Michael R Glatfelter

07 Dec 2020

I would first look at the notary laws for the state I am in, and call the SOS to see if that is permissible in that state. Breaking the law twenty times before and not getting caught is not an excuse for doing it again. The judge would not accept that defense. If you cannot communicate with your signer, offer to help find a notary that understands the language.

jrequarth@requarth.com

07 Dec 2020

Suggest that the signer find a notary that he can communicate with. I would refuse to notarize the document.

Jerry Lucas

07 Dec 2020

Follow the notary laws for your state regarding translations. Google Translate is a free tool that can translate about 90 foreign languages. The notary can type a question or instructions in English and click a button to translate into a foreign language The customer can answer in a foreign language and translate the answer into English. This eliminates the human translator, dishonesty, and conflict of interest.

Betty DeReese

07 Dec 2020

This is always a difficult situation. Will the information be relayed accurately? What is the daughters gain in dad signing this form? Is there someone in my work place that speaks the language that can translate for me as to what the daughter has relayed to the father. That is how I handled it when closing real estate transactions for 39 years. I would also allow the daughter to speak to my manager. If there isn’t anything out of line going on then the daughter should be out of sorts.

Pamela Pettis

07 Dec 2020

Absolutely not. Politely refer them to a notary who speaks their language.

Virginia Wells

07 Dec 2020

I would make an effort to locate a trusted employee or credible witness who speaks the language of the customer to do the interpreting for the father and myself.

Daniel Wainscott

07 Dec 2020

Hard no. Refer them to an attorney and title. 1 job is not worth risking an issue.

Linda Millstone

07 Dec 2020

Absolutely not. They will have to find a notary that speaks their language. I have no problem with a complaint to my manager. It's my commission on the line.

Gwendolyn Z. Green

07 Dec 2020

I would also allow her to translate if she has no financial gain from the document. If she has a financial benefit, I would then allow her to speak to my manager. I'd rather protect my commission, the customer and be in compliance with the law than to possibly break the law.

Janet

07 Dec 2020

If the document won't benefit her, that's fine. If not, let her complain to my manager. My manager better have my back.

Lynette M Vesely Waller

07 Dec 2020

I would politely refuse to perform the notary. Our rules are very explicit that translators should not be used. I would explain this to the client and my supervisor. My supervisor should understand that it is my certification that would be at risk. I would offer to help them find a notary who speaks their language. To me it does not matter if the relative would gain or not financially. Our rules are very clear.

Tea Godfrey

07 Dec 2020

Explain that state law requires you to be able to communicate directly with the signer. Offer to try and help find a notary who speaks his language.

Diana Maze

07 Dec 2020

If you have a smart phone, there is an app called Translate that you can use.

betty dedman

07 Dec 2020

I won't notarize this. How do you really KNOW that she won't have a financial interest? Does he have a will and the daughter will inherit monies/property from this transaction. We should always remember that are primary purpose in witnessing documents is to prevent fraud. Let them get this document notarized at their bank, OR, if they come from another county, let them get it notarized there, OR, let them find a notary that speaks the language. There is ALREADY too much theft in this county, and I won't participate in more.

Bari Vaz

07 Dec 2020

In California, we are forbidden to notarize for a client with whom we cannot directly communicate - no translator allowed! As for the daughter's statement “We’ve had this type of document notarized before, and the other Notaries didn’t have any problem with me interpreting for my father,” I would respond that if this occurred in California then the notarizations were not done legally and could be challenged in court. And yes, please call my manager. If they are knowledgeable they will back me up. If my manager tries to insist, then it's time for me to find another job.

latifah abdus-salaam

07 Dec 2020

I am new. But is it possible to use a translation service?

Sandy H.

07 Dec 2020

I would politely let them know I am not comfortable with notarizing the document due to the language barrier and offer to help them find a notary who speaks the same language. If she insisted on speaking with my manager, again I would politely let them know that I am commissioned by my state, not by my employer.

Heather Sue Wilson

07 Dec 2020

Refuse to notarize since you can't communicate with the signer, then if possible, help the daughter find a bilingual notary. If she still want to speak to the manager, call the manager. Hopefully the manager with back-up the notary, since it's the notary who has the right of refusal.

JAMES

07 Dec 2020

First I would explain that I am not comfortable doing the notary because I am not able communicate directly with him. However, I am willing to check with my supervisor to find someone in the office that maybe able to speak directly to him. As a last resort I would assist him by looking on line for nearby Notary that might be able to assist in completing this notary.

Chaleen

07 Dec 2020

I would first make sure there was not another notary in the office that could communicate with the signer, or a co-worker who could translate for the signer. If neither are available, I would politely decline to do the notary based on my inability to communicate directly with the signer and recommend that they find a notary who is able to communicate with him.

Caroline Green

07 Dec 2020

With regard to notarizing a dicument for a client that does not speak English, I woukd refer them back to the source of the person that prepared the document and I would not notarize the document.

Rick

07 Dec 2020

I would use a telephonic translation service to Engage the signer

Julie.white.jw@gmail.com

07 Dec 2020

I want to preface this by saying I am new to being a notary but moving along I believe this is a case where I would have to refuse notarizing the dad’s signature. If it was for the daughters signature I would proceed.

Joseph Hunt

07 Dec 2020

If you do not understand the language being spoken, there is no way for you to know what is being translated. Let the manager make the decision and follow their guidelines. Make sure the manager signs the agreement that is to be followed.

jan myers

07 Dec 2020

I would call NNA and get advise on how to proceed, since I cannot speak or understand the signer. I believe another alternative is available via NNA.

Patti

07 Dec 2020

In CA, you have to be able to communicate directly with signer, so I would not notarize. My supervisor is not a notary and refers all notary questions right back to me.

Judith Seki

07 Dec 2020

If the signer cannot directly communicate to me that he understands the document and is willing to to sign it, I cannot perform the notarization. If my job is jeopardized, I would need to show my employer the California Notary Handbook, and if necessary ask the employer to speak with the offie of the Secretary of State. If the employer does not respect my integrity as a notary, that is sad. If I lose my job, I might need to pursue a case of unlawful termination. However, I would prefer to work elsewhere!

Theresa Shannon

07 Dec 2020

I wouldn’t perform the notarization. I wouldn’t allow the daughter to translate as I could not determine if she is party directly or indirectly to the proceeds. If the Father wishes to have the documents translated and return then I can properly serve- I would assist in referring if possible to a Notary who speaks the language. Having been raised by immigrants I have learned that things I translated as a younger person had deeper legal ramifications which I may have affected in my interpretations.

Julie Poochigian

07 Dec 2020

You should have none byes interpreter available.

Gary Thomas

07 Dec 2020

I would simply offer to help them find a notary that is able to communicate in the father’s language. Otherwise the risk is too great.

DORIS LAUL

07 Dec 2020

I would explain to her that, for the protection of all involved, including myself, that I would need a neutral third party to translate, whether or not she would have any interest in the document. I would see if someone in my office would be able to do that. If not, I would let her know that she would have to produce a neutral translator. My reasons being that, even if she personally may not benefit from the document, she may be trying to get a notarization for someone who would. Unfortunately, it's that kind of world anymore.

Joe Ewing

07 Dec 2020

Maybe if the SOS printed the disclaimer in Spanish or the other language besides English, we might be able to use a translator. Otherwise that’s a hard no.

Delores Williams

07 Dec 2020

I would comply with the State's Notary Public regulations concerning interpreters. In addition, I would thank the daughter for her communication efforts and explain why I must refuse this Notary transaction in front of the Manager. Before concluding my interaction, I would recommend a Notary Public who speaks the language of the signer.

Michael Harris

07 Dec 2020

I would refuse to notarize. I would suggest that the father and daughter find a notary who does not need a translator.

ssaiz@juno.com

07 Dec 2020

In the event that there is a language barrier concern, I would suggest to either find a notary that speaks the language and can communicate what the signers intentions are. As a notary your liable if you have an unwilling signer that is not sure what they are getting them self into and you notarize the document.

lroy@riverside-chamber.com

07 Dec 2020

I would let them speak with the manager. I would also have the manager refuse the notary... They are complaining for a reason.

jediforcejeremy@gmail.com

07 Dec 2020

My understanding is that under no circumstances are we allowed to have a third party translate for a signer, even if that person has no direct benefit from the document. I would make every effort to find them a notary who speaks the language, but would refuse to sign the document. I would let them speak to my manager and hopefully my manager would back me up. If they ask me to sign anyway, I would explain that it would constitute a misdemeanor (depending on the document) and that a fine could ensue, which could extend to my manager.

Karla Tuttle

07 Dec 2020

We can not use a translator. Go to your supervisor and request a Spanish speaking notary do the notary.

Nathan

07 Dec 2020

In California you cannot have an interpreter communicate for the client. You must be able to directly communicate with the person signing. So if this issue came up I would let them complain to my boss as there’s nothing my boss could do either since it’s the law here in California. Although I would try to find someone else in the office that spoke the same language of the clients so that the Notary could be completed by them. But in no way shape or form should you continue with the notary if you cannot communicate with the client in California. Even if your boss gets mad at you. Whatever your boss does to you is going to be way less worse than what the state would do to you for not complying with the rules and laws if caught.

William

07 Dec 2020

Refuse the signing. Simply put, the Notary has to fully understand the signer fully and to be able to communicate in the Notary’s own words. Anything short of that puts the Notary’s commission at risk.

Alan W Waldo

07 Dec 2020

I would tell her feel free to talk to my manager if that is what she wished as I have nothing to hide. If we didn't have an interpreter in the office I would suggest using Google Translate or Telephone Interpreting Services, where for an extra fee the person on the telephone will listen and interpret both sides of the conversation. Otherwise I would not be able to do the notarization.

stallworthshawanda@gmail.com

07 Dec 2020

I would refuse to notarize the document because I can't be sure of (1) That the father understands what is going on and (2) If the daughter is communicating or actually explaining to the father what I am really saying or if she really understand what I am saying. Just to be safe, I would recommend her going to a notary that speaks the signer's language. I can't be certain that he understands and we must be able to access the signer and their understanding of what is going on and what they are sighning.

Tina Wallace

07 Dec 2020

If I'm unable to communicatw directly with the signer I cannot notarize his documents.

Arvind Nischal

07 Dec 2020

I have this situation before in my life that I was not able to communicate with the signer. Her relatives keep on forcing me to Notarize this document because the other Notary is not available to do so. While talking with them I find out their co relatives in their country and their phone # . Maybe it cost me some money to did so. I called them and find out the total FRAUD to sell her land in her city and get the money .More over when the co-relative was taking with the signer she keep on crying of this situation and she refuse to sign. I refuse to do their Notarization . So in this situation I will call his friend or relative in his country and then see what happen?

Ella Nimz

07 Dec 2020

I’m bilingual and work in a office . We ask and document that the interpret does not have any financial gain in this document . We have a translator form for the interpreter to sign and we ID and log then in the notary book and have them sign . Still communicate with signer to explain , but we are not attorney’s we can’t give advice , we are there to make sure the person before us is the person signing. Not all people communicate verbally anyway , he could say I need this notarized in English and leave it at that . It’s hard to say over all how much a person understands of what they are singing .

Teresa Bitner

07 Dec 2020

Locate a notary that speaks the language needed.

Ron G.

07 Dec 2020

According to the NNA, you must be able to communicate directly with the signer, not with a translator because they can make innocent mistakes that can create confusion or might deliberately mislead you and or your signer. If you can’t communicate without help, you should not notarize.

jaksemasok@yahoo.com

07 Dec 2020

I have a hand held translator and most i phones and some androids have a translator apt already on them. I have used them at our local food bank and they work well. If they would not let me use the translator I would refuse to do it...

Jen Faiz

07 Dec 2020

I would refuse to perform the notarization, and would recommend a bi-lingual notary in the area.

Gretchen Jackman

07 Dec 2020

So sorry, no. I'll find her a Notary that speaks her Father's language. I have no way of knowing if she is translating truthfully, or if her Father is understanding what he is signing, to sign of his own free will. "The manager" can yell all he wants. I'm not risking MY Commission on it. (Oh, and it happens to be the law in my state, so...)

Nancy E Ferris

07 Dec 2020

I'd let her speak to the manager.

Kim

07 Dec 2020

Regardless of whether or not my boss would "get mad at me" I would not complete the signing. In California we are not permitted to notarize if we are not able to directly communicate with the signer. Best practice is to get someone that can communicate directly with the signer. Make sure to explain to the daughter that while others may have done it in the past it is against the law therefore you are unable to assist them but will do your best to find another notary.

Sandra L Doan

07 Dec 2020

Florida law prohibits a notary from notarizing for a signer who does not speak or understand the English language. I would decline and suggest a bilingual notary.

gamblinrosanne@gmail.com

07 Dec 2020

I would refuse to sign but I would try to help them find a Notary that speaks their language. Maybe a RON agent, if that is possible. The father must understand what he is signing and if the Notary cannot communicate with him, how would the Notary be compliant with the law.

Howard Elliott

08 Dec 2020

it may be unfortunate However you seek my service you explain so i can understand, that cannot happen i am unable to assist at that time communication is the key . at the end of the day the father did not tell me anything.

F Johnson

08 Dec 2020

In Arizona, we are permitted to notarize Foreign language documents as long as the certificate is in a language we can read and is appropriate. However, we must be able to communicate directly with the signer. We should never rely on an interpreter as they may have something to gain in the transaction and we would not be able to determine if the signer is willing, competent and understands what they are signing.

Ellen WSmith

08 Dec 2020

A notary is required to be able to speak directly to the signer. I would not continue with this notary. I have a two occasions had to explain that I can not speak to what other notaries do. If I can speak directly to the signer, if I see indications that the signer does not understand the document or if I suspect fraud in the transaction I am required not refuse to notarize. My boss already knows this through open communication with her.

Claire F

08 Dec 2020

What language are they speaking? Is there someone in the workplace that can translate? Is the document in English? What is the purpose of the notary? Who is to benefit from the notary? Finding someone in the workplace that can understand and read the language to interpret for you is the best solution. Of course, we may Not have that option available to us. If the document was in English and the daughter was not a beneficiary, I would consider doing the notary. Example: the document was a pre printed DMV form requesting a duplicate registration and not a transfer of title. As for the daughter threatening to go to your supervisor, your supervisor cannot force you to do a notary that is outside standard practices set forth by your state and your supervisor cannot retaliate against you for not doing the notary.

L.M.

08 Dec 2020

As a notary, it's important that you are able to communicate directly with the signer so you can make sure they are of sound mind when completing the service.

Rosaria Rita Lake

09 Dec 2020

I would explain to the daughter that I would need to communicate directly with her father and that I will see if I can help them find a Notary Agent that speaks their language. I would not take the chance to open a situation that could leave me liable for misinformation.

Jamal Bazley

09 Dec 2020

Here in the state of Fl interpreters are not allowed. If you don't not speak and understand the same language as the signer it is advised that you recommend them to a notary that speaks the same language.

Bonita Sargeant

09 Dec 2020

I notarize in my workplace as well and fortunately there is a language line in my office which all employees have access to in order to avoid misinterpretations of information.

Bridgett

09 Dec 2020

If you are not a Notario and you don't understand or speak the language of your client do not notarize. You have no idea what is being communicated between the interpreter and the client. Call the notary hotline for advice in this situation.

Lisa

09 Dec 2020

If I don't speak the language of the SIGNER, it's a flat NO!

Ms. McGill

09 Dec 2020

I would refuse to notarize and try to refer them to a notary who speaks their language.

Michelle Adrenne Hyso

09 Dec 2020

I absolutely would NOT perform the notary. The laws in California are very clear about this specific scenario.

SUSAN PETRIE

10 Dec 2020

The question is what would you do if the daughter wants to interpret and you tell her no, and she wants to speak to your manager. OK, You call the hiring party and let them tell her no. Meanwhile, pack up your package and get ready to leave when that coversation is over.

Patricia Walworth

10 Dec 2020

In California, a notary must be able to communicate directly with the signer to be certain that nothing is lost in translation. I would apologize to the signer and his daughter and let them know that they will need to find a notary who speaks the same language as the signer for them to be able to legally perform the notarization. In situations like these when a someone is questioning what is or is not allowed, I offer to look at the rules in my handbook with them and if they are still questioning the rules we can call the NNA hotline. They are welcome to speak with my boss and I can explain the rules to him as well, but when it comes to notarizations the Secretary of State is my boss so unless he publishes a new Notary Public Handbook, I have to go by the rules we have now.

Lee

10 Dec 2020

It is my understanding that Arizona is the only state that allows an interpreter. As a California notary, I must be able to verbally communicate directly with the signor. Working at a Credit Union with a large Hispanic membership [and not being fluent in Spanish myself] I pass these notarizations to one of several Spanish speaking notaries in our office.

REINA SANDOVAL

10 Dec 2020

In the State of California, translators or interpreters are not permissible during a notarization. Direct communication is an essential requirement when notarizing any foreign language documents. The notary and the signer must be able to communicate. I would explain the situation to her and suggest that they use the services of a notary who speaks the same language.

JOHN c MCELHENNY

11 Dec 2020

call the loan officer and let him know what is going on and ask if they can send someone to translate for the singing ask her to pleas leave

LorieJo

14 Dec 2020

I would direct them to a notary that speaks the language. So many on here want to utilize the internet to interpret but I would disagree. While working in upstate NY, I had many employees that spoke different versions of Spanish (PR, Cuba, Mexico). When I would use Google to translate their statements then translate my response, it was rarely correct.

WTHARRISJR@HOTMAIL.COM

15 Dec 2020

Find a bilingual notary agent. I would need to be able to communicate with the customer,

Denise Dear

15 Dec 2020

If the father speaks no English, I would ask the daughter if she has legal guardianship to handle the business affairs of the father. If no, then I would seek guidance from the manager or follow company rules.

B

24 Dec 2020

Have the daughter sign a Translator's Affidavit?

betty ann walborn

01 Jan 2021

I seem to remember in my training that if you came across this type of situation if would be best to help find the signer and daughter a Notary that speaks the same language as the father and daughter. If the daughter has a financial interest in the document that could present a problem.

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